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    #1

    usage of over and in

    Is there a difference of meaning in the following sentences.

    1. The rate has increased IN the past 4 years.
    2. The rate has increased OVER the past 4 years.

    Thanks,
    tedphy


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    #2

    Re: usage of over and in

    Not a teacher. I believe both mean during; no, there isn't a difference.

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    #3

    Re: usage of over and in

    Quote Originally Posted by tedphy View Post
    Is there a difference of meaning in the following sentences.

    1. The rate has increased IN the past 4 years.
    2. The rate has increased OVER the past 4 years.

    Thanks,
    tedphy
    I would infer no difference and, as Plugged posted, "during" is OK too.

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: usage of over and in

    I feel a slight difference with "over" -- it could imply that the increase has been gradual, perhaps in stages. With the "in" version it simply tells you that it's more now than four years ago. However, it could also be that the writer intended no difference at all.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #5

    Re: usage of over and in

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    I feel a slight difference with "over" -- it could imply that the increase has been gradual, perhaps in stages. With the "in" version it simply tells you that it's more now than four years ago. However, it could also be that the writer intended no difference at all.
    Hi,

    So you intent to say that with "The rate has increased in the past 4 years", the rate increased towards the end of that 4 years and not a gradual increase from the begining of that 4 years?

    Regards,
    Anish
    (Not a teacher - Correct me if I am wrong)

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    #6

    Re: usage of over and in

    Quote Originally Posted by anishjp View Post
    Hi,

    So you intent to say that with "The rate has increased in the past 4 years", the rate increased towards the end of that 4 years and not a gradual increase from the begining of that 4 years?

    Regards,
    Anish
    (Not a teacher - Correct me if I am wrong)
    No, there's no implication about that at all.

    It simply means that four years ago, I know it was X and now I know it's Y. I don't know if it went up a tiny bit in each of the four years, if it only went up one time last week, or if it went up only once, three and half years ago, and has been steady since then.

    However, if you said "over the past four years" I might thing it was a little higher three years ago, a little higher than than two years ago, a bit higher yet last year, and now it's at its current rate.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.


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    #7

    Re: usage of over and in

    Thank you for your replies.

    If I wanted to say the average loss rate of the past four years is X%, would it has different meaning if I say:

    1) The loss rates average X% over the past four years. or
    2) The loss rates average X% in the past four years

    Thanks,
    tedphy

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    #8

    Re: usage of over and in

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    No, there's no implication about that at all.

    It simply means that four years ago, I know it was X and now I know it's Y. I don't know if it went up a tiny bit in each of the four years, if it only went up one time last week, or if it went up only once, three and half years ago, and has been steady since then.

    However, if you said "over the past four years" I might thing it was a little higher three years ago, a little higher than than two years ago, a bit higher yet last year, and now it's at its current rate.
    Hello, Barb_D.

    May I ask whether this "than than two years ago" is a mistake? I've googled it and have found some news hits. One hit comes from CNN International. If it exists, what is the difference between it and the normal than?

    Thanks

    Richard

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    #9

    Re: usage of over and in

    It was just a typo - sorry for any confusion it caused.

    tedphy - because you refer to an average, which assume an increase of some sort in each year, though not (necessarily) the same increase, I don't find a difference in meaning in those last two example, but I would expect to hear the "over version.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.


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    #10

    Re: usage of over and in

    I wanted to say the average loss rate in past 4 years is X%. For example, the loss rates were 10%, 20%, 30, 10%, 5% then the average loss rate of the past years is (10% + 20% + 30% + 0%) / 4 = 15%.

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