Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: claim for

    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • French
      • Home Country:
      • France
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Mar 2008
    • Posts: 1,183
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #1

    Cool claim for

    Hello!


    I need your help on these ones!

    Which is the right idiom: to claim something or to claim for something?

    -Do we actually need "for" in these cases?:
    -ask someone for their consent
    -ask someone for their car
    -ask someone for their permission

    Thank you.
    W

    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Bulgarian
      • Home Country:
      • Bulgaria
      • Current Location:
      • Bulgaria

    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 5,000
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #2

    Re: claim for

    I’m not a teacher.

    Hi Will17,

    Here are a few connotations of the verb “claim”:

    This matter claims attention.
    Magical properties are sometimes claimed for certain medicines.
    The discoverer claimed the island for the nation.
    He claimed the victory.
    He claimed that he'd been cheated.
    You should be able to claim against the car insurance.
    She claims to own this property.
    We have to claim to be exempt.
    We must to claim one's right.
    I claim that the hearing should be postponed.
    The young prince has to claim the throne.
    May I not claim your confidence?
    We have the intention to claim on you.
    I claim that it is false.
    He is claimed to be the only survivor.
    He claimed to have reached the top of the mountain.
    He claimed to be the best tennis-player in the school.
    Compensation could be claimed against the government for the loss to the owner.
    The Hillsborough Stadium disaster claimed the lives of 96 Liverpool supporters.

    Regarding to the noun “claim” the things are a far cry from this above.

    a far cry = very different from

    Regards,

    V.

    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Jun 2010
    • Posts: 16,020
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #3

    Re: claim for

    -Do we actually need "for" in these cases?:
    -ask someone for their consent
    -ask someone for their car
    -ask someone for their permission

    Yes, Will, you do.

    Rover

    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • French
      • Home Country:
      • France
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Mar 2008
    • Posts: 1,183
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #4

    Re: claim for

    Will you say: Can I ask you for your car?

    Can we say: Can I ask you your car?

    Thank you.

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 23,075
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #5

    Re: claim for

    Quote Originally Posted by Will17 View Post
    Will you say: Can I ask you for your car? Yes, I might say that.

    Can we say: Can I ask you your car? No.

    Thank you.
    .

  2. BobK's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 15,854
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #6

    Re: claim for

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    -ask someone for their consent
    -ask someone for their car
    -ask someone for their permission

    Yes, Will, you do.

    Rover
    - ...almost always. If you're making a claim for money FOR something, you need 'for'*. If, for example you win a car in a competition and you go to the arranger of the competition to claim it, you could say 'I've come to claim my car' (the car is the thing you're claiming).

    b

    PS * But 'permission' is a special case; the 'for' is implied. So people can say, for example, 'There's no need to ask for my permission' or 'There's no need to ask permission'
    Last edited by BobK; 02-Sep-2010 at 11:14. Reason: Added PS

    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Jun 2010
    • Posts: 16,020
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #7

    Re: claim for

    Fair point, Bob.

    Rover

    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • French
      • Home Country:
      • France
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Mar 2008
    • Posts: 1,183
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #8

    Re: claim for

    Can we say "to claim FOR a credit note"?

    Thank you

  3. BobK's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 15,854
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #9

    Re: claim for

    Quote Originally Posted by Will17 View Post
    Can we say "to claim FOR a credit note"?

    Thank you
    I don't think so. As cash is specifically not involved, it feels odd to me. I'd say 'spend' (on the analogy of cash) or 'present' (/prɪ'zent/) on the analogy of banking a cheque. I suppose you could claim AGAINST a credit note... not sure

    b

    PS The obvious term 'cash in' (what you do with your chips after a night at the casino) is ruled out because you can't exchange it for cash.
    Last edited by BobK; 06-Sep-2010 at 18:01. Reason: Added PS

Similar Threads

  1. Claim up
    By davood007 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 17-Jul-2010, 22:26
  2. claim
    By jiang in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 08-Jun-2010, 15:02
  3. have a claim on his love
    By lauraguan in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 31-May-2010, 09:40
  4. working her claim
    By Bushwhacker in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 12-Nov-2009, 19:11
  5. claim to have vs claim to have had and who vs whom
    By kiranlegend in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 27-Aug-2008, 15:45

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •