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  1. #1
    panicmonger is offline Member
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    Smile apostrophe of a noun with reduced clause

    Hi, Hello to everyone. Good day.

    Can I use an apostrophe after a noun with a reduced relative clause. For example:

    1. The candidates being chosen's scandals broke last year. (the noun head is scandals)

    2. There were many candidates chosen's scandals last year

    Is the use of apostraphe correct in this context?
    Thank you.

  2. #2
    bhaisahab's Avatar
    bhaisahab is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: apostrophe of a noun with reduced clause

    Quote Originally Posted by panicmonger View Post
    Hi, Hello to everyone. Good day.

    Can I use an apostrophe after a noun with a reduced relative clause. For example:

    1. The candidates being chosen's scandals broke last year. (the noun head is scandals)

    2. There were many candidates chosen's scandals last year

    Is the use of apostrophe correct in this context?
    Thank you.
    No, it's not correct. Are you trying to say that there were scandals about the choice of candidates?

  3. #3
    panicmonger is offline Member
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    Default Re: apostrophe of a noun with reduced clause

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    No, it's not correct. Are you trying to say that there were scandals about the choice of candidates?
    These are what I am trying to say; do you accept them?

    1. There were many scandals involving the candidates chosen last year.
    2. Many scandals of the candidates being chosen broke last year.

    The first sentence says that the candidates were chosen and the scandals involved them.

    The second sentence expresses that the scandals occurred when the candidates were being chosen.

  4. #4
    Pedroski is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: apostrophe of a noun with reduced clause

    1. The candidates being chosen's scandals broke last year. (the noun head is scandals) Ugghh!

    You're trying to make a possessive determiner of 'candidates being chosen's', which is hard enough, if not impossible. But you already have a determiner-- 'the'. That is like trying to write:

    *The John's scandals. Use either 'The' or 'John's, but not both. The possessive determiner 'John's cannot be an adjective.

    How about: Scandals involving the candidates (in the process of) being chosen broke last year.

    It just occurred to me, that if you get the possessive determiner right: 'chosen candidates' ' then you can write eg:

    The chosen candidates' scandals broke last year, during the election.

    cf The plants were damaged by the crowd's trampling.

    2. There were many candidates chosen's scandals last year.

    Ditto here: 'many scandals' not '*candidates chosen's scandals' 'many' is a quantifier of degree, and as such a subspecies of determiner.

    'candidates chosen's' cannot be a noun, because chosen is not a noun here. It is the past participle of choose, and as such can be an adjective. Adjectives do not take the possessive marker 's The chosen is a noun. The chosen candidates is a noun phrase. The chosen candidates' wives has 'The chosen candidates' ' as a possessive determiner.

    'The candidates chosen will remain in the room.' Here chosen is a postnomial adjective.

    There were many scandals last year involving the chosen candidates

    The scandals don't really belong to the candidates, they involve the candidates.
    Last edited by Pedroski; 02-Sep-2010 at 07:29. Reason: Thought of something else!

  5. #5
    Pedroski is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: apostrophe of a noun with reduced clause

    What were you actually translating? Something like:

    去年候选人的丑闻爆发了

    我学习中文呢所以这事有很意思

  6. #6
    panicmonger is offline Member
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    Default Re: apostrophe of a noun with reduced clause

    Quote Originally Posted by Pedroski View Post
    What were you actually translating? Something like:

    去年候选人的丑闻爆发了

    我学习中文呢所以这事有很意思
    Thank you, Pedroski.


    我学习中文呢所以这事很有意思.

    To me, I will reverse these two words.
    Thanks for your helping hand.

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