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  1. #1
    heyt is offline Member
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    plural noun or singular

    Hello,

    Could you tell me if this sentence is correct if I mean that Jim and Ann are two friends of mine, two different people, i.e. not siblings ora couple.

    Jim and Ann have got a car.

    Thank you,
    heyt

  2. #2
    Rover_KE is offline Moderator
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    Re: plural noun or singular

    Your sentence means that Jim and Ann have a car which they share and own jointly, even though they are not siblings or a couple.

    Perhaps you mean 'Jim and Ann each have a car'.

    That means Jim has a car and Ann has different car.

    Rover

  3. #3
    heyt is offline Member
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    Re: plural noun or singular

    Thank you, I see.

    What abou this sentence:

    Jim and Ann both have a car.

  4. #4
    Pedroski is offline Senior Member
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    Re: plural noun or singular

    Jim and Ann have got a car. If you pronounce the 'and' forcefully, in a high tone, then you have said the same as:
    Jim and Ann both have a car. They each own a car.

    'Jim and Ann have got a car.' is a bit ambiguous, with possible meanings:

    Jim and Ann together have a car. They share the car.(one car)
    Jim and Ann each have a car. They each have a car. (two cars)
    Jim and Ann together have recently aquired a car. (one car)
    Jim and Ann have both recently aquired a car. (two cars)

    What a lot of meanings!

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