Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14

Thread: shudder/shutter

  1. #1
    birdeen's call is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • Poland
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    5,099
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default shudder/shutter

    Are these two words pronounced differently?

    The Collins Dictionary gives the following pronunciations.
    /ˈʃʌdə/
    /ˈʃʌtə/

    But I don't think it's true. I think "shudder" is pronounced exactly like "shutter" - with an unvoiced /t/, or rather the flap, [ɾ]. My first question is if I'm right about it. I'm almost sure I'm right it is so in General American, but how about other accents?

    Another thing is that pronunciations in dictionaries are phonemic, so they use phonemes without any details. Maybe these are two phonemes realized with the same allophone? But that would contradict the definition of a phoneme, wouldn't it?

  2. #2
    Raymott's Avatar
    Raymott is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    19,739
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: shudder/shutter

    Quote Originally Posted by birdeen's call View Post
    Are these two words pronounced differently?

    The Collins Dictionary gives the following pronunciations.
    /ˈʃʌdə/
    /ˈʃʌtə/

    But I don't think it's true. I think "shudder" is pronounced exactly like "shutter" - with an unvoiced /t/, or rather the flap, [ɾ]. My first question is if I'm right about it. I'm almost sure I'm right it is so in General American, but how about other accents?
    I say 'shutter' with a [t] and 'shudder' with a [d]. It kind of makes sense! I don't see any need for learning how to produce flaps, taps, trills or clicks for learners of English. You can always slip into a dialect if you need to spend a period of time somewhere, but even then it's not necessary.

    Another thing is that pronunciations in dictionaries are phonemic, so they use phonemes without any details. Maybe these are two phonemes realized with the same allophone? But that would contradict the definition of a phoneme, wouldn't it?
    The flap [ɾ] is an allophone of /t/ in some American dialects. /ˈʃʌtə/ and /ˈʃʌɾə/ are the same word. I don't think there are any minimal pairs with [t] and [ɾ]. They are two allophones of the same phoneme, /t/.
    The only justification for learning [ɾ] would be if they were different phonemes - if */ɾ/* and */t/* were different words. I don't think this happens anywhere.

    (The same applies to glottal stops. /ˈʃʌtə/ and /ˈʃʌʔə/ are the same word.)
    R.
    Last edited by Raymott; 15-Sep-2010 at 08:11.

  3. #3
    birdeen's call is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • Poland
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    5,099
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: shudder/shutter

    I say 'shutter' with a [t] and 'shudder' with a [d].

    Thanks!

    I don't see any need for learning how to produce flaps, taps, trills or clicks for learners of English. You can always slip into a dialect if you need to spend a period of time somewhere, but even then it's not necessary.

    Well, I don't learn because it's necessary any more. I enjoy the comfort of learning what's interesting to me.

    The flap [ɾ] is an allophone of /t/ in some American dialects. /ˈʃʌtə/ and /ˈʃʌɾə/ are the same word. I don't think there are any minimal pairs with [t] and [ɾ]. They are two allophones of the same phoneme, /t/.
    The only justification for learning [ɾ] would be if they were different phonemes - if */ɾ/* and */t/* were different words. I don't think this happens anywhere.

    (The same applies to glottal stops. /ˈʃʌtə/ and /ˈʃʌʔə/ are the same word.)

    I know [ɾ] isn't a phoneme. I don't think I agree with what you say about "the only justification". I'm just curious.

    Do you mean no dialect and no accent has [
    ɾ] as an allophone of /d/? Even in America?

  4. #4
    Raymott's Avatar
    Raymott is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    19,739
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: shudder/shutter

    Quote Originally Posted by birdeen's call View Post
    I say 'shutter' with a [t] and 'shudder' with a [d].

    Thanks!

    I don't see any need for learning how to produce flaps, taps, trills or clicks for learners of English. You can always slip into a dialect if you need to spend a period of time somewhere, but even then it's not necessary.

    Well, I don't learn because it's necessary any more. I enjoy the comfort of learning what's interesting to me.
    Oh, I know that. I meant for students of English in general.
    "One can always slip into dialect when one needs to." Better?

    The flap [ɾ] is an allophone of /t/ in some American dialects. /ˈʃʌtə/ and /ˈʃʌɾə/ are the same word. I don't think there are any minimal pairs with [t] and [ɾ]. They are two allophones of the same phoneme, /t/.
    The only justification for learning [ɾ] would be if they were different phonemes - if */ɾ/* and */t/* were different words. I don't think this happens anywhere.

    (The same applies to glottal stops. /ˈʃʌtə/ and /ˈʃʌʔə/ are the same word.)

    I know [ɾ] isn't a phoneme. I don't think I agree with what you say about "the only justification". I'm just curious.
    Again, I meant for the average learner of English. "There is no need for learners of English ever to produce a
    [ɾ]" Better?

    Do you mean no dialect and no accent has [
    ɾ] as an allophone of /d/? Even in America?
    No, this time I meant what I said. [ɾ] is an allophone of /t/. I suppose it follows that [ɾ] can't be an allophone of /d/ as well, since that would make [d] and [t] allophones, which, I believe, doesn't occur anywhere in English.
    Of course, phonetically, some Americans might say
    [ɾ] in 'shutter' no differently from [d] in 'shudder', but if that became normal, the new reality would be that [t] and [d] are allophones in 'shutter'-type words.
    I should make clear that this is all to the best of my knowledge. If there is any native speaker living in a community that uses [ɾ] and [d] interchangeably, that would be interesting to hear about.
    If that were the case, differentiating 'ladder' and 'latter' etc. would need to be done from context.


  5. #5
    birdeen's call is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • Poland
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    5,099
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: shudder/shutter

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    I should make clear that this is all to the best of my knowledge. If there is any native speaker living in a community that uses [ɾ] and [d] interchangeably, that would be interesting to hear about.
    If that were the case, differentiating 'ladder' and 'latter' etc. would need to be done from context.

    I do hope someone'll say it. I'm almost sure I hear some Americans pronounce these words in the same manner. I can be wrong because I'm not young and my ears aren't to be trusted.

    I shall look for it on the web too. If I find something I'll post it here (probably with new questions ).

  6. #6
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    15,639
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: shudder/shutter

    Quote Originally Posted by birdeen's call View Post
    I do hope someone'll say it. I'm almost sure I hear some Americans pronounce these words in the same manner. I can be wrong because I'm not young and my ears aren't to be trusted.
    Same here. I'm told they sound the same in some American accents, and they do sound the same to me. For many years the song Ghost riders in the sky, conjured up for me a surreal image involving airborne http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ghost_writers ...
    b

  7. #7
    Raymott's Avatar
    Raymott is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    19,739
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: shudder/shutter

    Quote Originally Posted by birdeen's call View Post
    I do hope someone'll say it. I'm almost sure I hear some Americans pronounce these words in the same manner. I can be wrong because I'm not young and my ears aren't to be trusted.

    I shall look for it on the web too. If I find something I'll post it here (probably with new questions ).
    Speech defects don't count.
    Also if the speakers in the community can differentiate the sounds, but others can't, that doesn't count either.

  8. #8
    riquecohen's Avatar
    riquecohen is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • Brazil
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    5,628
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: shudder/shutter

    Quote Originally Posted by birdeen's call View Post
    I do hope someone'll say it. I'm almost sure I hear some Americans pronounce these words in the same manner. I can be wrong because I'm not young and my ears aren't to be trusted.

    I shall look for it on the web too. If I find something I'll post it here (probably with new questions ).
    Your ears certainly can be trusted. If you have ever been to New York, where I was born and raised, you surely have heard shutter and shudder pronounced exactly alike. I can´t make a definite statement about the rest of the U.S.
    I´m proud of my N.Y. accent, which will probably be extinct soon and replaced by a new N.Y. accent, as a result of the arrival of new immigrant groups.

  9. #9
    Tullia's Avatar
    Tullia is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    628
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: shudder/shutter

    Quote Originally Posted by riquecohen View Post
    Your ears certainly can be trusted. If you have ever been to New York, where I was born and raised, you surely have heard shutter and shudder pronounced exactly alike. I can´t make a definite statement about the rest of the U.S.
    I´m proud of my N.Y. accent, which will probably be extinct soon and replaced by a new N.Y. accent, as a result of the arrival of new immigrant groups.

    Indeed; it seems to me similar to "Whadda ya gonna do aboud id?"[What're you going to do about it?], and variants, which I associate with NY accents, especially Italian-American ones somehow - possibly as a result of too many bad Mafia movies, of course!

  10. #10
    riquecohen's Avatar
    riquecohen is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • Brazil
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    5,628
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: shudder/shutter

    Quote Originally Posted by Tullia View Post
    Indeed; it seems to me similar to "Whadda ya gonna do aboud id?"[What're you going to do about it?], and variants, which I associate with NY accents, especially Italian-American ones somehow - possibly as a result of too many bad Mafia movies, of course!
    You´re right, Tullia, although some of those movies were great. At one time (early to mid-20th century,) the population of N.Y. was roughly 1/3 Italian-American, somewhat less than 1/3 eastern European Jews and about 1/3 Irish-American The remainder were Blacks, Latinos and various other groups. It was primarily from the first 2 groups that the stereotypical N.Y. accent derives. As immigration patterns have changed dramatically, the influence of these new immigrants´ languages (Chinese, Korean, Spanish, etc.) is increasingly felt in N.Y. speech.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. [General] “I shudder to think…”=“I shudder at the thought…”?
    By vil in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 18-Jan-2009, 16:37
  2. Shiver, tremble, shake, quiver, shudder and quake
    By nene_mataro in forum General Language Discussions
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 16-Sep-2007, 06:38

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •