Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 35
  1. #11
    Koronas is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Greece
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    140
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: long time no see

    Quote Originally Posted by e2e4 View Post
    "It's been a long time since I've seen you."
    I say this. I'm a native English speaker.

    The phrase "since I've seen you" has connotations of meeting and discussion, whereas "since I saw you" implies that I merely saw you in the distance and it refers to a specific place.

    For example: "It's been a long time since I saw you at the cricket ground".

    This sentence infers NO meeting or discussion. The person may have been playing cricket and I saw him on the field.

  2. #12
    ostap77 is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Ukrainian
      • Home Country:
      • Ukraine
      • Current Location:
      • Ukraine
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    3,328
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: long time no see

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    NOT A TEACHER

    (1) I am not angry. I really do want a teacher to answer your excellent

    question. I want to know the answer, too.

    (2) I was able to find this in an outstanding grammar book:

    It is/has been a long time since I have seen him. = I have not seen him

    for a long time.

    (3) Here is some more from that grammarian:

    It is/has been 4 years since I have studied it. (refers to an action in

    the past)

    It is/has been 4 years that I have studied it. (the action continues)

    It was 4 years ago that he died. (a point in the past)

    It is 4 years since he died. (attention to a period of time)

    (3) Your question is excellent: Can we say:

    It has been a long time since I saw you. I really cannot answer

    your question. I hope a teacher will enlighten us.
    Guess your previous examples refer the action that started in the past and have been going on up to the moment of speaking. "Sihce I have studied it" kind of means he began to study and have studied ever since.

  3. #13
    e2e4 is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • Serbo-Croatian
      • Home Country:
      • Bosnia Herzegovina
      • Current Location:
      • Bosnia Herzegovina
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    844
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: long time no see

    Quote Originally Posted by Koronas View Post
    I say this. I'm a native English speaker.

    The phrase "since I've seen you" has connotations of meeting and discussion, whereas "since I saw you" implies that I merely saw you in the distance and it refers to a specific place.

    For example: "It's been a long time since I saw you at the cricket ground".

    This sentence infers NO meeting or discussion. The person may have been playing cricket and I saw him on the field.
    All is permitted to the natives!
    And they always have an explanation why they avoid the grammar rules.
    You Koronas should have been a lawyer, not a writer only!
    Anyway, thank you for the explanation!
    Never have I ever heard it before!!
    I asked myself many times why some people speak that way. And I saw it in a book as well.
    But the writer of the book didn't give an explanation.

    You did.

  4. #14
    ostap77 is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Ukrainian
      • Home Country:
      • Ukraine
      • Current Location:
      • Ukraine
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    3,328
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: long time no see

    Quote Originally Posted by Koronas View Post
    I say this. I'm a native English speaker.

    The phrase "since I've seen you" has connotations of meeting and discussion, whereas "since I saw you" implies that I merely saw you in the distance and it refers to a specific place.

    For example: "It's been a long time since I saw you at the cricket ground".

    This sentence infers NO meeting or discussion. The person may have been playing cricket and I saw him on the field.
    So with "since" we might use both Past Simple and Present Perfet. What would be the rule than?

  5. #15
    Koronas is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Greece
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    140
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: long time no see

    I stress that I am not a teacher. However, I have been using English for nearly 60 years, so I can think to myself: "when would I say that?" Usually I can answer myself and give an explanation. Occasionally I get it wrong and someone else provides the correct version.

    I don't know any rules. I just know what sounds correct. :)

    And now I must go to bed.

  6. #16
    ostap77 is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Ukrainian
      • Home Country:
      • Ukraine
      • Current Location:
      • Ukraine
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    3,328
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: long time no see

    Quote Originally Posted by Koronas View Post
    I stress that I am not a teacher. However, I have been using English for nearly 60 years, so I can think to myself: "when would I say that?" Usually I can answer myself and give an explanation. Occasionally I get it wrong and someone else provides the correct version.

    I don't know any rules. I just know what sounds correct. :)
    When would you say that?

  7. #17
    TheParser is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    4,877
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: long time no see

    Quote Originally Posted by ostap77 View Post
    Guess your previous examples refer the action that started in the past and have been going on up to the moment of speaking. "Sihce I have studied it" kind of means he began to study and have studied ever since.
    NOT A TEACHER

    (1) I found this in Mr. Michael Swan's popular book:

    Sometimes a present perfect is used to refer to a finished point of time:

    It is now a year since we have last discussed your future.

    (More normal [says Mr. Swan]: since we last discussed ....)

    (2) Kindly remember that Mr. Swan is writing from the point of view

    of British English.

    (3) Maybe (only "maybe") we can say that American English

    favors "It has been a long time since I have seen you," but that "It

    has been a long time since I saw you" would be OK, too.

    (4) Other posters have already shared their great ideas. Let's

    see what others think.

  8. #18
    ostap77 is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Ukrainian
      • Home Country:
      • Ukraine
      • Current Location:
      • Ukraine
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    3,328
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: long time no see

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    NOT A TEACHER

    (1) I found this in Mr. Michael Swan's popular book:

    Sometimes a present perfect is used to refer to a finished point of time:

    It is now a year since we have last discussed your future.

    (More normal [says Mr. Swan]: since we last discussed ....)

    (2) Kindly remember that Mr. Swan is writing from the point of view

    of British English.

    (3) Maybe (only "maybe") we can say that American English

    favors "It has been a long time since I have seen you," but that "It

    has been a long time since I saw you" would be OK, too.

    (4) Other posters have already shared their great ideas. Let's

    see what others think.
    Can you give the name of this book? I would very much like to read ti! Pleeeeease!

  9. #19
    TheParser is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    4,877
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: long time no see

    Quote Originally Posted by ostap77 View Post
    Guess your previous examples refer the action that started in the past and have been going on up to the moment of speaking. "Sihce I have studied it" kind of means he began to study and have studied ever since.
    NOT A TEACHER

    (1) If I understand that grammarian correctly, "It has been 4 years since I have

    studied it" = I studied it 4 years ago. In other words, I stopped studying

    it in 2006.

    (2) If you want to say that you have been studying it from 2006 to today,

    you should say:

    It has been 4 years that I have studied it. (I am continuing to study it.)

  10. #20
    ostap77 is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Ukrainian
      • Home Country:
      • Ukraine
      • Current Location:
      • Ukraine
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    3,328
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: long time no see

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    NOT A TEACHER

    (1) If I understand that grammarian correctly, "It has been 4 years since I have

    studied it" = I studied it 4 years ago. In other words, I stopped studying

    it in 2006.

    (2) If you want to say that you have been studying it from 2006 to today,

    you should say:

    It has been 4 years that I have studied it. (I am continuing to study it.)
    I'd like to read that book. What's the full name of it?

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. [General] Long time no see
    By Joe Wen in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 25-Aug-2010, 15:06
  2. long time...
    By GUEST2008 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 26-Feb-2009, 22:34
  3. much time/long
    By Morpheus in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 12-Jan-2008, 19:19
  4. in a long time/ for a long time
    By sairashab in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 03-Mar-2007, 04:54
  5. In a long time / For a long time
    By theanglophile in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 04-Sep-2005, 08:05

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Hotchalk