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  1. #1
    RobertT is offline Junior Member
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    Default How to identify dependent and independent clauses

    Hi teachers,

    I'd like to ask, how to differentiate the dependent from the independent clause of a sentence.

    Thank you.
    Last edited by RobertT; 22-Sep-2010 at 15:58.

  2. #2
    TheParser is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: How to identify dependent and independent clauses

    Quote Originally Posted by RobertT View Post
    Hi teachers,

    I'd like to ask, how to differentiate the dependent from the independent clause of a sentence.

    Thank you.
    NOT A TEACHER

    (1) Just as a child is dependent on his/her parents, so is

    a dependent (subordinate) clause "dependent" on an independent

    clause.

    (2) The dependent clauses are in bold:

    I want to eat because I am hungry.

    I know that you did it.

    The woman whom I marry must know how to cook.

    (a) As you can see, those subordinate clauses depend on the

    independent clauses to make sense. If you walked up to someone

    on the street and said, "Because I am hungry," that stranger would

    think that you were "crazy." But if you said, "I want to eat because I

    am hungry," the stranger would understand you completely.

    (b) You also notice that dependent clauses are often introduced by

    conjunctions such as because and that. Whom is called a relative

    pronoun.

    (3) You can also drop a dependent clause, and the sentence is still

    "good" English. For example, if I drop the three subordinate clauses

    above, I get:

    I am hungry.

    I know.

    The woman must know how to cook.

    Grammatically speaking, those three sentences (without a subordinate

    clause) are "good" English.

  3. #3
    RobertT is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: How to identify dependent and independent clauses

    That makes sense, thank you!

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