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  1. #1
    Over the top's Avatar
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    Default Which one has more stop consonants?

    Hello
    Which one has more stop consonants, British or American accent?
    Thanks

  2. #2
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: Which one has more stop consonants?

    We have the same number of basic sounds.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Which one has more stop consonants?

    I was not talking about the number of sounds. I was asking about the consonants which are not pronounced as American /t /in what or tighten,
    Let's rephrase the question, which one tends to use more stop consonants?

  4. #4
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: Which one has more stop consonants?

    I am not sure exactly what you're after with your question- a stop consonant is a sound made by stopping the flow of air, like /p/, so it doesn't necessarily mean consonants that are not pronounced as I understand it.

    In the UK, the glottal stop (not pronouncing the /t/ in bottle, etc) is regional, so there's no clear national pattern- it's associated with London dialects, though its use is wider, but not universal. Dialects, which are still strong in British English, do things sufficiently differently to make it pretty difficult to make a national variant pattern. Other than this, we tend to change sounds to make them easier in connected speech so /t/ can become /d/, etc. It's also affected by factors like age- the glottal stop is becoming more widespread among younger speakers outside places like London.
    Last edited by Tdol; 30-Sep-2010 at 06:13. Reason: Typo

  5. #5
    birdeen's call is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: Which one has more stop consonants?

    Quote Originally Posted by Over the top View Post
    I was not talking about the number of sounds. I was asking about the consonants which are not pronounced as American /t /in what or tighten,
    Let's rephrase the question, which one tends to use more stop consonants?
    What do you mean by "stop consonants"?

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Which one has more stop consonants?

    Quote Originally Posted by birdeen's call View Post
    What do you mean by "stop consonants"?
    Here's a complete list: (A stop is a plosive)
    Stop consonant - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    English stops
    [p], [t], [k] (aspirated word-initially, tenuis in clusters with s)
    [b], [d], [ɡ] (in most dialects: partially voiced word-initially, fully voiced intervocally)
    [ʔ] (glottal stop, not as a phoneme in most dialects)

  7. #7
    birdeen's call is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: Which one has more stop consonants?

    Thanks you. I knew what they were but I think the OP could mean something else by it...

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