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    #1

    'To go for an excursion'?

    Is 'Why don't you want to go for the excursion' good English? Or does it have to be 'on the excursion'?

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    #2

    Re: 'To go for an excursion'?

    '...on the excursion sounds better to me.'

    Rover

  1. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: 'To go for an excursion'?

    To go for it means to decide upon it, to go on it means to travel through it.

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: 'To go for an excursion'?

    Quote Originally Posted by konungursvia View Post
    To go for it means to decide upon it, to go on it means to travel through it.
    ... when 'excursion' is used to mean a trip. If the context makes 'excursion' into a sort of metaphor meaning 'the part of the activities devoted to going on a trip' then 'for' is possible (but 'go for' is a prepositonal verb, unlike the phrasal verb 'go for' that means 'choose'):

    'I'm going for the excursion, but I can't stay on for the party in the evening.'

    b

  3. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: 'To go for an excursion'?

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    ... when 'excursion' is used to mean a trip. If the context makes 'excursion' into a sort of metaphor meaning 'the part of the activities devoted to going on a trip' then 'for' is possible (but 'go for' is a prepositonal verb, unlike the phrasal verb 'go for' that means 'choose'):

    'I'm going for the excursion, but I can't stay on for the party in the evening.'

    b
    I agree, and I think that's more or less what I was hoping to say.

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