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  1. #1
    M56 Guest

    as much ... as ...

    In which situation would you, personally, use number one over number two?

    1. This is as much unnecessary as it is undesirable.

    2. This is as unnecessary as it is undesirable.

  2. #2
    Mister Micawber's Avatar
    Mister Micawber is offline Key Member
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    Re: as much ... as ...

    .
    Personally, I would not touch #1 with a ten-foot parser. Isn't 'unnecessary' non-gradable (lexically speaking, that is)?

    .

    .

  3. #3
    M56 Guest

    Re: as much ... as ...

    Quote Originally Posted by Mister Micawber
    .
    Personally, I would not touch #1 with a ten-foot parser. Isn't 'unnecessary' non-gradable (lexically speaking, that is)?

    .

    .
    I see.

    <Isn't 'unnecessary' non-gradable (lexically speaking, that is)? >

    It may be, but pragmatically...

    Do you ever use "it is extremely unnecessary"?
    Last edited by M56; 01-Jul-2005 at 13:39.

  4. #4
    M56 Guest

    Re: as much ... as ...

    Quote Originally Posted by Mister Micawber
    .
    Personally, I would not touch #1 with a ten-foot parser. Isn't 'unnecessary' non-gradable (lexically speaking, that is)?

    .

    .
    How about:


    TOTALLY UNNECESSARY

    PROBABLY UNNECESSARY

    COMPLETELY UNNECESSARY

    ONLY UNNECESSARY

    OFTEN UNNECESSARY

    ALSO UNNECESSARY

    WHOLLY UNNECESSARY

    SO UNNECESSARY

    BOTH UNNECESSARY

    ENTIRELY UNNECESSARY

    EVEN UNNECESSARY

    HOW UNNECESSARY

    AS UNNECESSARY

    A BIT UNNECESSARY

    LARGELY UNNECESSARY

    Etc.

    And:

    How Necessary is Oxygen?

    How necessary is it for me to "bubble" my Earth Juice?
    Last edited by M56; 01-Jul-2005 at 17:41.

  5. #5
    Steven D's Avatar
    Steven D is offline Senior Member
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    Re: as much ... as ...

    Quote Originally Posted by M56
    How about:


    TOTALLY UNNECESSARY

    PROBABLY UNNECESSARY

    COMPLETELY UNNECESSARY

    ONLY UNNECESSARY

    OFTEN UNNECESSARY

    ALSO UNNECESSARY

    WHOLLY UNNECESSARY

    SO UNNECESSARY

    BOTH UNNECESSARY

    ENTIRELY UNNECESSARY

    EVEN UNNECESSARY

    HOW UNNECESSARY

    AS UNNECESSARY

    A BIT UNNECESSARY

    LARGELY UNNECESSARY

    Etc.

    And:

    How Necessary is Oxygen?

    How necessary is it for me to "bubble" my Earth Juice?

    Of course. - nothing wrong with those.

    That was absolutely unnecessary.

    http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&l...unnecessary%22+

    http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&l...2+&btnG=Search
    Last edited by Steven D; 01-Jul-2005 at 23:11. Reason: typo

  6. #6
    M56 Guest

    Re: as much ... as ...

    Thanks for the links, xmode. What do you think of this?

    In which situation would you, personally, use number one over number two?

    1. This is as much unnecessary as it is undesirable.

    2. This is as unnecessary as it is undesirable.

  7. #7
    Steven D's Avatar
    Steven D is offline Senior Member
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    Re: as much ... as ...

    Quote Originally Posted by M56
    Thanks for the links, xmode. What do you think of this?

    In which situation would you, personally, use number one over number two?

    1. This is as much unnecessary as it is undesirable.

    2. This is as unnecessary as it is undesirable.
    To me, number 1 is for emphasis. You have stronger feelings about something with that statement. Number 1 could be heard as having more emotion attached to it. That's the way it seems to go often. Choices are often made based on emphasis and relative degrees of formality and informality. There are other things I guess, but those seem to come up quite often.

    The speaker may or may not be aware that he or she is making these choices. It depends.
    Last edited by Steven D; 02-Jul-2005 at 05:46.

  8. #8
    Steven D's Avatar
    Steven D is offline Senior Member
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    Re: as much ... as ...

    A student used "more foremost" as a comparative in her writing. Now, I could tell something was wrong with that. It just didn't sound right. And sure enough, it's not gradable.


    Has anyone memorized that list of adjectives?
    Last edited by Steven D; 02-Jul-2005 at 05:59.

  9. #9
    M56 Guest

    Re: as much ... as ...

    Quote Originally Posted by X Mode
    To me, number 1 is for emphasis. You have stronger feelings about something with that statement. Number 1 could be heard as having more emotion attached to it. That's the way it seems to go often. Choices are often made based on emphasis and relative degrees of formality and informality. There are other things I guess, but those seem to come up quite often.

    The speaker may or may not be aware that he or she is making these choices. It depends.
    That's exactly as I see it. What worries me is when native speakers reject such constructions because they demand that the adjective in question is absolute... ungradable.

  10. #10
    Steven D's Avatar
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    Re: as much ... as ...

    Quote Originally Posted by M56
    That's exactly as I see it. What worries me is when native speakers reject such constructions because they demand that the adjective in question is absolute... ungradable.

    If an adjective is not gradable, and someone uses it as a gradable adjective, I believe I'll notice it. In other words, I can separate language which does not sound good because it is not usual, and probably incorrect, and language which might seem to be "not okay" in a rather small "technical" way, but in reality really is - OKAY.

    So it seems that although "unnecessary" is an ungradable adjective, it can be modified with an extreme adverb. However, I would not do the same, for example, with "foremost".

    I can hear myself saying "that was completely unnecessary". - no problem. If one says there's something wrong with it, this, in my opinion, means that one learned English after having acquired it as a first language. One should trust that one speaks correctly. I'm not relearning anything, thank you - if you know what I mean. My language is correct.
    Last edited by Steven D; 02-Jul-2005 at 12:38.

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