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  1. #1
    chebu's Avatar
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    Question Question from BBC article "How do judges decide on sentences?"

    I can't figure out what "this" means in the 5th sentence of
    "Who, What, Why: How do judges decide on sentences?"

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-10852764

    "Not only did the circumstances of the case differ, but so did the actions of the accused - and this goes some way to explaining the sentencing gap between the two. Ridley pleaded guilty to manslaughter and grievous bodily harm charges while Scott opted for a full trial, denying the charges set before him."

    Does THIS mean the difference between the circumstances and the actions of both accused, or the fact that "Ridley pleaded guilty to manslaughter and grievous bodily harm charges while Scott opted for a full trial, denying the charges set before him."?

    I'll be grateful for your help.




  2. #2
    Munch's Avatar
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    Default Re: Question from BBC article "How do judges decide on sentences?"

    Quote Originally Posted by chebu View Post
    I can't figure out what "this" means in the 5th sentence of
    "Who, What, Why: How do judges decide on sentences?"

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-10852764

    "Not only did the circumstances of the case differ, but so did the actions of the accused - and this goes some way to explaining the sentencing gap between the two. Ridley pleaded guilty to manslaughter and grievous bodily harm charges while Scott opted for a full trial, denying the charges set before him."

    Does THIS mean the difference between the circumstances and the actions of both accused, or the fact that "Ridley pleaded guilty to manslaughter and grievous bodily harm charges while Scott opted for a full trial, denying the charges set before him."?

    I'll be grateful for your help.


    "this" means "the fact that the circumstances of the case and the actions of the accused differed."

    The next sentence explains how they differed, "Ridley pleaded guilty to manslaughter and grievous bodily harm charges while Scott opted for a full trial, denying the charges set before him."

  3. #3
    bhaisahab's Avatar
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    Default Re: Question from BBC article "How do judges decide on sentences?"

    Quote Originally Posted by chebu View Post
    I can't figure out what "this" means in the 5th sentence of
    "Who, What, Why: How do judges decide on sentences?"

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-10852764

    "Not only did the circumstances of the case differ, but so did the actions of the accused - and this goes some way to explaining the sentencing gap between the two. Ridley pleaded guilty to manslaughter and grievous bodily harm charges while Scott opted for a full trial, denying the charges set before him."

    Does THIS mean the difference between the circumstances and the actions of both accused, or the fact that "Ridley pleaded guilty to manslaughter and grievous bodily harm charges while Scott opted for a full trial, denying the charges set before him."?

    I'll be grateful for your help.


    "Not only did the circumstances of the case differ, but so did the actions of the accused - and this goes some way to explaining the sentencing gap between the two.
    In this sentence "this" refers to "the actions of the accused".

  4. #4
    chebu's Avatar
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    Smile Re: Question from BBC article "How do judges decide on sentences?"

    Quote Originally Posted by Munch View Post
    "this" means "the fact that the circumstances of the case and the actions of the accused differed."

    The next sentence explains how they differed, "Ridley pleaded guilty to manslaughter and grievous bodily harm charges while Scott opted for a full trial, denying the charges set before him."
    To Munch

    Thank you for detailed assistance!

  5. #5
    chebu's Avatar
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    Smile Re: Question from BBC article "How do judges decide on sentences?"

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    "Not only did the circumstances of the case differ, but so did the actions of the accused - and this goes some way to explaining the sentencing gap between the two.
    In this sentence "this" refers to "the actions of the accused".

    To bhaisahab

    Thank you for your assistance!

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