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  1. #1
    ostap77 is offline Key Member
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    nickel and dimed it

    I heard when watching a movie.

    "He's been with the Irish mob for seventeen years. Never nickeled and dimed it. Always big operations." I looked it up in a dictionary and it only gives a defenition as an adjective not a verb. What would nickel and dime something mean?
    Last edited by ostap77; 11-Oct-2010 at 02:46.

  2. #2
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    Barb_D is offline Moderator
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    Re: nickel and dimed it

    In this case, I guess it means doing things involving small amounts of money.

    The way I'm used to seeing it as a verb is something like "Don't nickel and dime me" or "I'm being nickeled and dimed to death" to mean that there are a ton of tiny little charges instead of one big charge. For example, you rent a room for a party, but then you get a charge for table cloths and a set up fee and another charge for having the wait staff work on a Sunday, etc.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  3. #3
    ostap77 is offline Key Member
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    Re: nickel and dimed it

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    In this case, I guess it means doing things involving small amounts of money.

    The way I'm used to seeing it as a verb is something like "Don't nickel and dime me" or "I'm being nickeled and dimed to death" to mean that there are a ton of tiny little charges instead of one big charge. For example, you rent a room for a party, but then you get a charge for table cloths and a set up fee and another charge for having the wait staff work on a Sunday, etc.
    Can I use it in the following context?

    " Ann is always nickeling and dimeing me." meaning that I'd like to go out with her but she doesn't take me seriously. She treats me like "loose change"

  4. #4
    Barb_D's Avatar
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    Re: nickel and dimed it

    I've never heard it used in any context that doesn't involve money.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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