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Thread: grade

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    #1

    grade

    "John has been graded an A on a test." Can we use it to say that someone got an A on a tset?

    Another meaning that I looked up in a dictionary was to give a particular rank and level of pay to a job. There was no context though.

    "He's been graded to a higher salary since got a promotion." Correct or incorrect?

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    #2

    Re: grade

    Neither of these sound right to me.

    The teacher graded John's test and awarded him an A. John's grade was an A on the test.
    That teacher is a hard grader - make one spelling mistake and expect to drop 5 points.

    His promotion bumped him up two salary grades.
    His new salary grade is quite a bit higher than his old one.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #3

    Re: grade

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    Neither of these sound right to me.

    The teacher graded John's test and awarded him an A. John's grade was an A on the test.
    That teacher is a hard grader - make one spelling mistake and expect to drop 5 points.

    His promotion bumped him up two salary grades.
    His new salary grade is quite a bit higher than his old one.
    You can not use it as a verb in the second context?

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    #4

    Re: grade

    Not really - you could say "They have regraded the salary levels at the company" but not the way you've used it.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #5

    Re: grade

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    Not really - you could say "They have regraded the salary levels at the company" but not the way you've used it.
    "bumped him up two salary grades" How much did he start to get twice as much? Does a slary grade refers to a certain amount of money?

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    #6

    Re: grade

    Typically in an American company, you will have salary grades that cover a range of salaries.

    An entry-level position for a position held by a college-educated person may be called a salary grade 12 (just for example) and may run from $25,000 to $40,000. Then there may be a grade 13 that runs from $32,500 to $47,500. Then there may be a grade 14 that runs from $38,500 - $52,000 etc. If your job is a grade 14 position, you may earn anywhere in that range, depending on other factors, like how long you've worked for the company, how well you do your job, etc. Note that there is overlap in the grades.

    If someone gets bumped up two salary grades, he doesn't get paid twice as much, but he has a new range of salary that he can earn. If he was half-way between the high and low end, what we call the salary mid-point, and they move him up to the mid-point of the new salary grade, he will see a nice raise in pay, but it's also possible that he won't see any raise at all the first year in his new grade because the low end overlaps with where he was in his old grade.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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