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  1. #1
    yolandag4 is offline Newbie
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    Default Proper use of coming and going

    I would like to know the proper way of using coming and going. I am frequently corrected when I use these two. I will provide an example. My friend lives about one hour south of me. I will oftentimes say " I'm going down to visit you" or " are you coming to my house". If I'm with her I will say "are you going to my house any time soon". Please tell me the proper way of using coming and going.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Proper use of coming and going

    Generally come is used when the direction is towards where the speaker is, was or will be at a relevant point in time, go when the direction is away from the speaker. Examples:

    a. Come here. (Towards me)
    b. Go towards the window. (Not towards me)
    c. Please come to my house this evening. (I will be at home)
    d. Please go to my house this evening. (I will not be there, but I want you to check that I locked the door.)
    e. I am going to Fredís party this evening. (Clearly away from the speaker)
    f. Will you come with me? (Come with + a person = accompany. If you come with me, by the time you get to Fredís party I will logically be there!)
    g. Are you coming to school tomorrow? (I am speaking to you on the telephone from school, or: we are both at school.).)
    h. Are you coming to school tomorrow? (Are you accompanying me?)
    i. Are you going to school tomorrow? (I am speaking from a place other than school.)

    One important point here is that sometimes there is no Ďcorrectí answer. The choice between come and go depends on how the speaker views the situation at the moment of speaking. In [f,] for example, the speaker could easily have chosen go.

    Incidentally, bring (towards the speaker and take (away from the speaker) are used in a similar way.

  3. #3
    yolandag4 is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: Proper use of coming and going

    Thank you very much. This helps understand the differences more clearly

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Proper use of coming and going

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    Generally come is used when the direction is towards where the speaker is, was or will be at a relevant point in time, go when the direction is away from the speaker. Examples:

    a. Come here. (Towards me)
    b. Go towards the window. (Not towards me)
    c. Please come to my house this evening. (I will be at home)
    d. Please go to my house this evening. (I will not be there, but I want you to check that I locked the door.)
    e. I am going to Fredís party this evening. (Clearly away from the speaker)
    f. Will you come with me? (Come with + a person = accompany. If you come with me, by the time you get to Fredís party I will logically be there!)
    g. Are you coming to school tomorrow? (I am speaking to you on the telephone from school, or: we are both at school.).)
    h. Are you coming to school tomorrow? (Are you accompanying me?)
    i. Are you going to school tomorrow? (I am speaking from a place other than school.)

    One important point here is that sometimes there is no Ďcorrectí answer. The choice between come and go depends on how the speaker views the situation at the moment of speaking. In [f,] for example, the speaker could easily have chosen go.

    Incidentally, bring (towards the speaker and take (away from the speaker) are used in a similar way.
    Neat explanation!

    We can add (if it is useful) that "to take" and "to bring" follow the same basic principle.

    you take something when you go somewhere
    you bring something when you come somewhere

    a. Come here and bring your exercise book with you. (Towards me)
    b. Go towards the window and take this poor plant with you. (Not towards me)
    c. Please come to my house this evening and bring a bottle of wine. (I will be at home)
    d. Please go to my house this evening and take your brother with you. (I will not be there, but I want you to check that I locked the door.)
    e. I am going to Fredís party this evening and I'm taking my sister. (Clearly away from the speaker)
    f. Will you come with me and bring your girlfriend too? (Come with + a person = accompany. If you come with me, by the time you get to Fredís party I will logically be there!)
    g. Are you coming to school tomorrow? If you are, then bring your tracksuit. (I am speaking to you on the telephone from school, or: we are both at school.).)
    i. Are you going to school tomorrow? If you are, then don't forget to take your tracksuit. (I am speaking from a place other than school.)

    Hope that helps too!

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