Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: doubt

  1. #1
    pallavi kakkar is offline Junior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Hindi
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • India
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    75
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default doubt

    Hi


    Please let me know which one is correct.


    1. I doubt if it is correct.

    2. I doubt it is correct.

    Regards
    Pallavi

  2. #2
    Rover_KE is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    14,119
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: doubt

    #2 is correct.

  3. #3
    5jj's Avatar
    5jj is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    28,168
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: doubt

    So is #1

  4. #4
    TheParser is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    4,921
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: doubt

    Quote Originally Posted by pallavi kakkar View Post
    Hi


    Please let me know which one is correct.


    1. I doubt if it is correct.

    2. I doubt it is correct.

    Regards
    Pallavi
    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    (1) According to Mr. Michael Swan's very popular Pratical English

    Usage, a clause after "doubt" may be introduced by:

    whether

    if

    that

    No conjunction

    (2) The Columbia Guide to Standard American English agrees.

    (3) Mr. Bryan A. Garner's A Dictionary of Modern American

    Usage (a book that many people trust) says:

    doubt that (use in negative sentences, questions, and statements

    of skepticism [you think it may not be true]).

    doubt whether (use mostly in affirmative statements [sentences that

    are not negative]). Again with skepticism.

    doubt if (suggests a conditional sentence). Mr. Garner says "doubt if" is

    "less sound" in American English. In other words, he does not seem to like it.

    *****

    Mr. Wilson Follett in his Modern American Usage says:

    I doubt that I can go. = I do not think that I can go. (Negative)

    I doubt whether I can go. = Not certain. Just a little negative.

    I doubt if I can go. = same as "doubt that."

    *****

    The New Fowler's Modern English Usage (Third Edition) tells us that

    since the last part of the 19th century, "doubt that" or no conjunction

    is often used with affirmative sentences. Its example: "I doubt that the

    White House is responsible for ...." Its example with no conjunction:

    He doubted [Mr. X] would sue him.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Tom: I have spent 24 hours doing this math problem. I have the

    correct answer.

    Martha: Sorry, but I know that you do not understand math

    very well. Excuse me for saying this, but I doubt that it is

    correct./ doubt it is correct.

    (I would not recommend "if" or "whether.")

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

  5. #5
    5jj's Avatar
    5jj is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    28,168
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: doubt

    I have read the preceding posts with interest, referred to other authorities, and tried to analyse how I use if, whether and that with doubt. The only conclusion I could reach was that some speakers use the words in one way, and some in another. I, for example, could use if or whether in TheParser's last example. In that specific example I believe that I would actually use at, and I feel that there would be a very slight difference if I used either of the other two, but I know that I cannot find 'rules' that would satisfy all native speakers.

Similar Threads

  1. doubt
    By Joxx in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 06-Apr-2008, 12:54
  2. Doubt
    By Unregistered in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 31-Mar-2008, 01:26
  3. doubt
    By kiranjyo in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 22-Mar-2008, 11:03
  4. Doubt if vs. Doubt whether
    By Kel in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 19-Mar-2008, 01:10
  5. doubt
    By san in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 10-Jun-2007, 20:41

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •