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Thread: on purpose

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    #1

    on purpose

    I have always believed that we say "on purpose" not "in purpose".

    Do we ever say "in purpose"?

  1. Mehrgan's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: on purpose

    Quote Originally Posted by ostap77 View Post
    I have always believed that we say "on purpose" not "in purpose".

    Do we ever say "in purpose"?


    I don't think "in purpose" has any sense at all. "on purpose", meaning "intentionally" is the right one.


    *not a teacher*

  2. philadelphia's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: on purpose

    Not a teacher

    No, it isn't correct. For instance, you could say either "he did it on purpose" or "he purposely did it".

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    #4

    Re: on purpose

    You can use 'in purpose', but not as a substitute for 'on purpose'

    These studies are commendable in purpose,
    Jimmy Wales set out to build a massive online encyclopedia ambitious in purpose and unique in design
    'The secret of success is constancy of purpose.' - Benjamin Disraeli. Here you could use 'in' instead of 'of'.

    Your purpose is your aim or intention. As the object of a preposition it becomes part of an adverbial.

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