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    #1

    In need of an idiom

    Greetings, I'm not sure if the English language has an equivalent, but here's a somewhat literal translation of the Lithuanian idiom: "Whatever is too much is unhealthy."

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    #2

    Re: In need of an idiom

    I probably need a bit more context, but I'd say " something is too much of a good thing".

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    #3

    Re: In need of an idiom

    Thanks a million. That's exactly what I need.

  1. BobK's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: In need of an idiom

    Quote Originally Posted by paul.moss View Post
    I probably need a bit more context, but I'd say " something is too much of a good thing".
    But Anewguest should note that the 'something' is not a part of the idiom. Something is 'too much of a good thing': example: 'I'd like another, but that would be too much of a good thing'.

    When you've had enough of something, you can also say 'Enough is enough', which can lead to a fairly well-worn joke about a Frenchman refusing to eat a second egg because 'Un oeuf ...' (I can't go on)

    There's also the saying 'Enough is as good as a feast' - but that's a bit old-fashioned (possibly because that sort of self-denial doesn't go well with a society brought up on easy credit. [end of today's sermon])

    b

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    #5

    Re: In need of an idiom

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    When you've had enough of something, you can also say 'Enough is enough', which can lead to a fairly well-worn joke about a Frenchman refusing to eat a second egg because 'Un oeuf ...' (I can't go on)
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  3. Raymott's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: In need of an idiom

    Quote Originally Posted by Anewguest View Post
    Greetings, I'm not sure if the English language has an equivalent, but here's a somewhat literal translation of the Lithuanian idiom: "Whatever is too much is unhealthy."
    "Everything in moderation" is also an idiom that might be appropriate. But it also has the implication that a little bit of something bad won't do you any harm.

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    #7

    Re: In need of an idiom

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    "Everything in moderation" is also an idiom that might be appropriate. But it also has the implication that a little bit of something bad won't do you any harm.
    We also have (in BrE) a little bit of what you fancy, though this is more often used as a justification for a spot of self-indulgence instead of a reminder to do things within limits.



    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    When you've had enough of something, you can also say 'Enough is enough', which can lead to a fairly well-worn joke about a Frenchman refusing to eat a second egg because 'Un oeuf ...' (I can't go on)

  4. BobK's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: In need of an idiom

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    We also have (in BrE) a little bit of what you fancy, though this is more often used as a justification for a spot of self-indulgence instead of a reminder to do things within limits.
    ...
    I don't know which came first - that saying or the song sung by Marie Lloyd - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia, suggesting (suggestively, of course): 'A little of what you fancy does you good'.

    b

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    #9

    Re: In need of an idiom

    How about more than enough is too much?

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    #10

    Re: In need of an idiom

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    I don't know which came first - that saying or the song sung by Marie Lloyd - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia, suggesting (suggestively, of course): 'A little of what you fancy does you good'.

    b
    I didn't know of the song. Will go and look for a recording.

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