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Thread: "formed with"

  1. #1
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    Default "formed with"

    Please teach me whether we can use "formed with" in the sense of "provided
    with"? For example, I think it is acceptable to say "The desk is provided on its
    top with a throughhole" in written English. My question is whether we can say
    "The desk is formed on its top with a throughhole", when we try to mean "A throughhole is formed on the top of the desk".

  2. #2
    mykwyner is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: "formed with"

    Usually, in English, when referring to manufactured items we use make or built. Therefore, the desk was made with a throughhole (which we would usually just call a hole). The word formed is typically used to describe something that was molded or shaped. "The ice castle was formed with turrets and a drawbridge."

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    Default Re: "formed with"

    Quote Originally Posted by mykwyner
    Usually, in English, when referring to manufactured items we use make or built. Therefore, the desk was made with a throughhole (which we would usually just call a hole). The word formed is typically used to describe something that was molded or shaped. "The ice castle was formed with turrets and a drawbridge."
    Thank you for your prompt reply.
    Maybe I should have limited my question to the technical English expression, such as
    in the patent specification. In the example, the desk is already made and then,a throughhole or hole is made on the top of it. This status is to be described.
    In a usual expression, it will simply be described as " the desk has a hole on its top".
    In the technical English expression, it is often described as "the desk is provided on a top thereof with a hole". My question is whether it is grammatically correct to say "the desk is formed on the top thereof with a hole". Since the technical English is the case, the way of expression may be somewhat awkward but that's is not a big problem. My question is whether the terms "formed with" can be used in the place of
    "provided with" from the grammatical view point. If you think the example is not good,
    then you may feel free to use "A" and "B" instead of "desk" and "hole", respectively.
    If this is not the right place to ask such a question like this, then I will widthraw my
    question.
    Thanks again for your kindness and patience.

  4. #4
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: "formed with"

    We can use 'furnished with', which has a formal meaning of 'provided with', which might work in this case. 'Formed' is, as you say, awkward, and doesn't really work for me. It is, however, grammatically correct- the problem it causes is meaning rather than grammar, so if you are looking for a substitute, how about 'furnished with'?

    PS We will try to deal with any language question.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: "formed with"

    Thank you very much for your kind answer.
    This is the right answer I wanted to receive.
    Thank you again and again.

    PS: my best personal regards to any language question teacher

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