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Thread: wake

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    #1

    wake

    Dear teachers,

    Would you tell me whether I am right with my interpretation of the expression in bold in the following sentence?

    His glides ended not with the usual feet-down splash into the sea, but with a long flat wake as he touched the surface with his feet tightly streamlined against his body. (Jonathan Livingston Seagull)

    wake = the wave that spreads behind a boat as it moves forward (at the present case behind Jonathan’s smoothly sliding body with his tightly bended feet )

    Thanks for your efforts.


    Regards,


    V.
    Last edited by vil; 04-Nov-2010 at 16:20.

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    #2

    Re: wake

    I'm not a teacher, but I worked several years in shipbuilding, and I know, that a wake is the track that appears in the water behind a moving boat/ship/vessel, in your example, a seagull

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    #3

    Re: wake

    Quote Originally Posted by Verona_82 View Post
    I'm not a teacher, but I worked several years in shipbuilding, and I know, that a wake is the track that appears in the water behind a moving boat/ship/vessel, in your example, a seagull
    Okay, you are right. However, you should also know that a comma can never be followed by "THAT". In that case the correct word would be "WHICH". It is not in order to bother you, I am just telling this for you to know...

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    #4

    Re: wake

    ...or WHO. Thanks Leandro-z for pointing that out, but we'd better not discuss defining and non-defining clauses in Vil's thread.

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    #5

    Re: wake

    in the wake of

    = In the noticeable disturbance of water behind (a maritime vessel).

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    #6

    Re: wake

    a long flat wake = a long scarcely perceptible track

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    #7

    Re: wake

    Quote Originally Posted by Leandro-Z View Post

    However, you should also know that a comma can never be followed by "THAT". In that case the correct word would be "WHICH". It is not in order to bother you, I am just telling this for you to know...
    Off-topic or not, that statement needs to be challenged.

    Who told you, Leandro, that a comma can never be followed by that? I've just done it twice - perfectly grammatically.

    That's completely incorrect advice.

    Furthermore, changing that after the (incorrect) comma to which is nonsense.

    Rover

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    #8

    Re: wake

    Okay, sorry if it turned into a misunderstanding. It was just for you to know (or to remind you)
    Last edited by Leandro-Z; 10-Nov-2010 at 01:16.

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    #9

    Re: wake

    And another thing: WHO can follow a comma in a non-defining clause. For example:

    Robert, who really likes ice-cream, back out my proposal.

    ...but you can`t say:

    The theory, that was firstly explained by Galileo Galilei, was related to the genetic relation between monkeys and human beings.

    instead, you write:

    The theory, which was firstly explained by Galileo Galilei, was related to the gentic relation between monkeys and human beings.

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    #10

    Re: wake

    In that case, Rover, it is the same as in Spanish. The verb can never be followed by a comma. However, there are exceptions. For example, when you beging the sentence with a linker. In the cases you showed us, there is a linker or you are adding something. What I tried to explain is that, in the case of Verona, "that" can`t follow the comma beacause, otherwise, the sense is lost. It is wrong to separate the VERB from the THAT CLAUSE.

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