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  1. #1
    M56 Guest

    Default "By", "with" or either?

    He washed it down __ a drink from a nearby fountain.

  2. #2
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: "By", "with" or either?

    With

  3. #3
    M56 Guest

    Default Re: "By", "with" or either?

    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    With
    Even if it is a passive sentence?

  4. #4
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: "By", "with" or either?

    It was washed down...? I'd still use 'with'.

  5. #5
    M56 Guest

    Default Re: "By", "with" or either?

    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    It was washed down...? I'd still use 'with'.
    I dug up these beauties:

    In the course of his narrative he refreshes himself by a draught from the drinking-horn into which meanwhile Hagen has pressed the juice of an herb.

    http://www.music-with-ease.com/gotterdammerung.html

    or succeedeth in smuggling in a drink, or after much importuning,
    the janitor is induced to cool the coppers by a draught from the spigot that sizzes and adds to the thirst that is not quenched;

    http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb.../hamorwpen.txt


    With these preliminary remarks, and after wetting his whistle by a draught from a small pocket flask, he made the echoes of Kenmuir ring with the following, which he sung to the old Gaelic air, "I am asleep, do not waken me:"-

    http://forums.delphiforums.com/dicti...Reading+%3E%3E

    ** Interesting to note here that Conan Doyle was also Scottish born.**

    I'm more and more convinced that "he washed it down by a draught from..." is a short-cut way of saying "he washed it down by taking a drink from" or "by means/way of". Maybe "Scottish ellipsis" is at hand.
    Last edited by M56; 14-Jul-2005 at 11:30.

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