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Thread: rest assure


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    #1

    rest assure

    is it rest assure or rest assured? thanks.

  1. M56
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    #2

    Re: rest assure

    Quote Originally Posted by junnem
    is it rest assure or rest assured? thanks.
    When preceded by a modal verb without "be" it is normally rest assure and when preceded by "be" it is normally rest assured.

    The "be" turns rest assured into an adjective expression.

    Just like:

    You can content yourself with...

    You can be contented with... (adjective)

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    #3

    Re: rest assure

    I'd be inclined to differ from M56 on this one. 'Rest' here means 'remain'; and 'assured' is an adjective, meaning <satisfied as to the certainty or truth of a matter>(Merriam-Webster).

    So I'm not sure how you could use 'rest assure'; though I note that it has a strong Internet presence as a typo.

    These are characteristic examples of 'rest assured':

    1. You can rest assured that the cheque's in the post.

    2. Rest assured that we'll do everything in our power to apprehend the perpetrators.

    3. You may rest assured that my intentions are entirely honourable.

    MrP


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    #4

    Re: rest assure

    thank you for help. here's another one. what's the difference, if any, between at the forefront and in the forefront? is there such a thing as on the forefront? again my thanks.

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    #5

    Re: rest assure

    Hello Junnem

    The 'forefront' is the front rank of an army.

    'at the forefront' is the most commonly heard, but 'in the forefront' is fine too.

    'on the forefront' is the least common of the three forms: it seems to be used with more of a sense of 'on the front line'.

    (It may seem a fine distinction; but you can be in the 'front rank' of an army without being on the 'front line'!)

    MrP

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