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  1. #1
    vectra's Avatar
    vectra is offline Member
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    Default Are these sentences balm for a native speaker's ear or nonsense?

    Hello,
    The question is the same: are these sentences OK?

    Is he really that knowledgeable? - Oh, yes. He EMBARKED ON the difficult life=path of entrepreneur way back in 1989.
    He had put so much on the line and if something went wrong now, nobody would BAIL Mr Harris OUT.
    The money for the goods was coming IN DRIBS AND DRABS, and Mr Harris did his best to KEEP ABREAST OF the competitors.
    His company nearly went bankrupt, but he had wisely HEDGED HIS BETS by investing part of his profits in sovereign bonds, and eventually managed to BOUNCE BACK.

    I tried to use the following expressions:
    to embark on
    to bail out
    in dribs and drabs
    to keep abreast of
    to hedge one's bets
    to bounce back

    Thank you very much in advance.

  2. #2
    Rover_KE is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: Are these sentences balm for a native speaker's ear or nonsense?

    Your use of the expressions is correct.

    'Balm to the ear' leaves a lot to be desired.

    Rover

  3. #3
    vectra's Avatar
    vectra is offline Member
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    Default Re: Are these sentences balm for a native speaker's ear or nonsense?

    Hello Rover,

    You are absolutely right about balm for a native speaker's ear. I simply translated an expression from Russian which means something pleasant word for word.

    Thanks for your prompt reply.

  4. #4
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: Are these sentences balm for a native speaker's ear or nonsense?



    Your sentence is very good. Well done

    Quote Originally Posted by vectra View Post
    Hello Rover,

    You are absolutely right about balm for a native speaker's ear. I simply translated an expression from Russian which means something pleasant word for word.

    Thanks for your prompt reply.
    I'm not sure I'd agree with Rover's 'leaves a lot to be desired', although your phrase does sound rather mannered. In Eng we have an idiom quite like the Russian one: Music to my ears - Idiom Definition - UsingEnglish.com. But I don't feel it quite fits in this context: if something is 'music to your ears' it's what you want to hear, rather than something that sounds good.

    b

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