Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    kvvic is offline Junior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • Ukrainian
      • Home Country:
      • Ukraine
      • Current Location:
      • Ukraine
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    65
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default I completely to reconcile it

    Dear all,

    Could you please help me with the sentence below.
    Please discuss it with them and then, I completely to reconcile it with the boss.
    1. Is the highlighted passage correct?
    2. Does 'reconcile' mean here the same as 'agree' (I will agree it with the boss)?
    3. Does 'completely' mean here the same as 'finally'?

  2. #2
    RonBee's Avatar
    RonBee is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    16,571
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: I completely to reconcile it

    Quote Originally Posted by kvvic View Post
    Dear all,

    Could you please help me with the sentence below.

    1. Is the highlighted passage correct?
    2. Does 'reconcile' mean here the same as 'agree' (I will agree it with the boss)?
    3. Does 'completely' mean here the same as 'finally'?
    1. No.
    2. No, the word "reconcile" doesn't mean anything there since that phrase makes no sense. Also, "I will agree it with the boss" is not an English sentence.
    3. No.


  3. #3
    kvvic is offline Junior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • Ukrainian
      • Home Country:
      • Ukraine
      • Current Location:
      • Ukraine
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    65
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: I completely to reconcile it

    Thanks for your prompt reply, RonBee!))
    Also, "I will agree it with the boss" is not an English sentence.
    I used the word 'agree' to mean:
    "3) If people agree on something, or in British English if they agree something, they all decide to accept or do something.
    e.g.: The court had given the unions time until September 11 to agree terms with a buyer." (Collins Cobuild Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary. 2008)
    Was my usage of this word totally wrong or is it due to the difference between AE and BE?

  4. #4
    RonBee's Avatar
    RonBee is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    16,571
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: I completely to reconcile it

    There might be a difference between AmE and BrE. (Perhaps I was hasty in my comments.) In AmE we would agree with somebody (or something). (As noted, you can also use "agree on".)

    ("I completely to reconcile it with the boss" still doesn't work.)


Similar Threads

  1. [General] reconcile/ indenture/ apprentice
    By vil in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 28-Jul-2010, 08:15
  2. [General] reconcile/make up/in someone's stead/invent/fabricate
    By vil in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 02-Apr-2010, 15:48
  3. completely etc
    By jiang in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 21-Apr-2007, 13:48
  4. completely
    By thru in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 28-Jan-2007, 17:55

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Hotchalk