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Thread: duck let loose

  1. #11
    BobK's Avatar
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    Default Re: duck let loose

    I thought you'd get it! (In English it's just 'boned' [ bones removed]. When the meat is cut off the carcase of the animal, it's a fillet: the animal is 'filleted'. So a boned animal is still vaguely animal-shaped and a filleted animal has flat slices of flesh cut off it. Fish are often filleted, but land animals can be.)

    b

  2. #12
    birdeen's call is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: duck let loose

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    I thought you'd get it! (In English it's just 'boned' [ bones removed]. When the meat is cut off the carcase of the animal, it's a fillet: the animal is 'filleted'. So a boned animal is still vaguely animal-shaped and a filleted animal has flat slices of flesh cut off it. Fish are often filleted, but land animals can be.)

    b
    I was wondering what the English word would be!

    It was a very tough one all the way, anyway.

  3. #13
    undertakerTR is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: duck let loose

    Quote Originally Posted by birdeen's call View Post
    You've got me obsessed too. I have no idea what "let loose" is about. Yet!

    PS: I've gooooooooooot it!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Uff!

    "Luzować" is a Polish culinary term which means "to remove the bones from (a bird)". For example, "luzować kaczkę" means "to remove the bones from a duck". Now, "luzować" is the infinitive. It must have been mistakenly translated to "to let loose". The adjectival participle is "luzowana" which gave "let loose", the English adjectival participle. The mistake is understandable. "Luzować" is etymologically akin to "loose", its general meaning (outside the kitchen) is "make loose". It has also other meanings. It can mean "relieve" as in "our shift will relieve yours", whence it's not far to "let loose".


    PPPS: I'm very proud of myself!
    Gosh! You are the man!
    Thank you birdeen's call. I can't explain how I'm relieved. Now I am truly satisfied with the answer. God bless you
    After such a trouble I think I should find or at least try cooking that "Duck Let Loose" on my own

  4. #14
    Barb_D's Avatar
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    Default Re: duck let loose

    Oh, nice job.

    Since I can't even adequately carve the Thanksgiving turkey, the idea of letting loose any sort of fowl is more than I'm ready for!
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  5. #15
    birdeen's call is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: duck let loose

    It's seems like a tough job. I never did that!
    Last edited by birdeen's call; 16-Nov-2010 at 22:12.

  6. #16
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    Default Re: duck let loose

    Quote Originally Posted by undertakerTR View Post
    well, it is a quotation from a polish restaurant menu.
    I think menus should be translated only by experienced chefs who speak both languages well, though badly translated menus are a delight to me. I remember once wondering what I would be eating if I ordered the scarified eggs I saw on a menu in China.

    Although my home is in the Czech Republic, my knowledge of Czech is very poor. However, when I eat in a restaurant, I always order from the Czech menu, not the English translation. I have learnt from pleasant experience what 'svickova' is, and this word means far more to me than 'candle steak', the normal English translation.

    I don't think that translating literally such English delights as 'toad in the hole' or 'bubble and squeak' would be very helpful to Polish diners.

  7. #17
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    Default Re: duck let loose

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    if I ordered the scarified eggs I saw on a menu in China.
    What did you find out?
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  8. #18
    5jj's Avatar
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    Default Re: duck let loose

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    What did you find out?
    Scrambled.

  9. #19
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    Default Re: duck let loose

    That's rather anti-climactic, don't you think?
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  10. #20
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    Default Re: duck let loose

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    I think menus should be translated only by experienced chefs who speak both languages well, though badly translated menus are a delight to me.

    I don't think that translating literally such English delights as 'toad in the hole' or 'bubble and squeak' would be very helpful to Polish diners.
    One of my favorites, seen on Brazilian menus, is translated for tourists as steak on a horse or beef on horseback. (Two fried eggs on top of a grilled steak.)

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