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  1. #1
    fenglish is offline Member
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    Question from which it was derived

    Hi,

    Found below sentence from Answers.com : statistic: Definition from Answers.com

    A numerical value, such as standard deviation or mean, that characterizes the sample or population from which it was derived.

    If remove "from" from above sentence, does the meaning has any changes??

    As in : A numerical value, such as standard deviation or mean, that characterizes the sample or population which it was derived.

    In my opinion, it is the same without the "from" before "which", I cannot feel any changes of the meaning.

    Thanks.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: from which it was derived

    Quote Originally Posted by fenglish View Post
    Hi,

    Found below sentence from Answers.com : statistic: Definition from Answers.com

    A numerical value, such as standard deviation or mean, that characterizes the sample or population from which it was derived.

    If you remove "from" from the above sentence, does the meaning has any changes??
    From is necessary. Note that it could be placed after derived with no change of meaning

  3. #3
    fenglish is offline Member
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    Default Re: from which it was derived

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    From is necessary. Note that it could be placed after derived with no change of meaning
    Now I can feel the change and understand the meaning if "from" is placed after "derived".

    It is hard to understand if using "from/of which" or "from/of that", are all of this kind of phrases have the same usage like the above sentence?? Sometimes I will get confusing above it.

    By the way, why "has any" should be deleted from "does the meaning has any changes" ??

  4. #4
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    Default Re: from which it was derived

    Quote Originally Posted by fenglish View Post

    By the way, why "has any" should be deleted from "does the meaning has any changes" ??
    The verb is far more natural:

    The meaning changes.
    Does the meaning change?


    Does the meaning have any changes? is not really acceptable English here.
    If you wanted the noun, you'd have to say," Is there a change of/in meaning?"

  5. #5
    fenglish is offline Member
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    Default Re: from which it was derived

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    The verb is far more natural:

    The meaning changes.
    Does the meaning change?


    Does the meaning have any changes? is not really acceptable English here.
    If you wanted the noun, you'd have to say," Is there a change of/in meaning?"
    Today when looking for the definition of "penny" from my phone dictionary, I found below similarly sentence which uses "of which" :

    Penny: the smallest unit of money in Britain of which there are 100 in a pound, or a small coin worth this much.


    Can I rewrite the above sentence like below? As in:

    Penny: the smallest unit of money in Britain which there are 100 of in a pound, or a small coin worth this much.

    I still don't understand the usage of "of/from which/that", please guide me the correct way to use such words.

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    fenglish is offline Member
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    Default Re: from which it was derived


  7. #7
    Raymott's Avatar
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    Default Re: from which it was derived

    Quote Originally Posted by fenglish View Post
    Today when looking for the definition of "penny" from my phone dictionary, I found below similarly sentence which uses "of which" :

    Penny: the smallest unit of money in Britain of which there are 100 in a pound, or a small coin worth this much.

    Can I rewrite the above sentence like below? As in:

    Penny: the smallest unit of money in Britain which there are 100 of in a pound, or a small coin worth this much.

    I still don't understand the usage of "of/from which/that", please guide me the correct way to use such words.
    Hi fenglish,
    It might be easier to explain by analogy with your native language. Can you tell us what it is?

  8. #8
    fenglish is offline Member
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    Default Re: from which it was derived

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    Hi fenglish,
    It might be easier to explain by analogy with your native language. Can you tell us what it is?
    I come from Asia,

    I am trying to forget my native language when using English, because I know this is the only way that can help me speak English in naturally.

    Please explain to me all in English.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: from which it was derived

    Quote Originally Posted by fenglish View Post
    I come from Asia,

    I am trying to forget my native language when using English, because I know this is the only way that can help me speak English in naturally.

    Please explain to me all in English.
    That's OK. It's just that you have English listed on your profile as your native language, but you make very basic mistakes that a native speaker wouldn't make. It's hard to know what to take for granted in those circumstances.

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    fenglish is offline Member
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    Default Re: from which it was derived

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    That's OK. It's just that you have English listed on your profile as your native language, but you make very basic mistakes that a native speaker wouldn't make. It's hard to know what to take for granted in those circumstances.
    Thanks for pointing out my mistakes.

    Can you explain in detail or guide with some examples? Why?

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