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  1. #11
    Raymott's Avatar
    Raymott is offline VIP Member
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    Re: from which it was derived

    Quote Originally Posted by fenglish View Post
    Thanks for pointing out my mistakes.

    Can you explain in detail or guide with some examples? Why?
    I'm not sure I understand. Do you mean you want a detailed explanation of why it's confusing to teach questions of basic English to someone who says their native language is English?
    I'll give one example: If your native language, or your best language, or the language you spoke as a child, is actually English, then we can't assume you've achieved fluency in any language at all. That might have some bearing on how you're answered.

    But that's a side issue. Perhaps there are many people who learn little bits of lots of languages and never gain a basic fluency in any. If that's the case, it's probably best on an ESL site like this to put one of your other languages as your native language.

  2. #12
    fenglish is offline Member
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    Re: from which it was derived

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    I'm not sure I understand. Do you mean you want a detailed explanation of why it's confusing to teach questions of basic English to someone who says their native language is English?
    I'll give one example: If your native language, or your best language, or the language you spoke as a child, is actually English, then we can't assume you've achieved fluency in any language at all. That might have some bearing on how you're answered.

    But that's a side issue. Perhaps there are many people who learn little bits of lots of languages and never gain a basic fluency in any. If that's the case, it's probably best on an ESL site like this to put one of your other languages as your native language.
    I originally mean why "It's hard to know what to take for granted in those circumstances"? I want a detailed explanation of it.

    From you answer, I think my English is still very bad, right?

    I feel a little sadness now.

  3. #13
    lauralie2 is offline Senior Member
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    Re: from which it was derived

    Quote Originally Posted by fenglish View Post
    A numerical value, such as standard deviation or mean, that characterizes the sample or population from which it was derived.


    Penny: the smallest unit of money in Britain of which there are 100 in a pound, or a small coin worth this much.
    The pattern you're dealing with works like this. Either the preposition is left at the end (1) or it is moved closer to its object (2):


    (1) ...the sample which it was derived from.
    (2) ...the sample from which it was derived.
    (1) ...smallest unit of money which there are 100 of
    (2) ...smallest unit of money of which there are 100

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    Correction

    If I remove "from" from above sentence, does the meaning has any changes??change?


    Alternatively,

    • ..., are there any changes in meaning?
    • ..., is there any change in meaning?
    • ..., does the meaning change any?



    Note,

    • ..., does the meaning has...
      • the verb 'has' should be in its base form
        • ..., does the meaning have...
          • the auxiliary 'does' carries tense
            • the meaning does have...
            • Ex: If I remove 'from', does the meaning change? <base verb>

  4. #14
    lauralie2 is offline Senior Member
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    Re: from which it was derived

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    I'm not sure I understand. Do you mean you want a detailed explanation of why it's confusing to teach questions of basic English to someone who says their native language is English
    How absurd. The PO's question is clearly stated in Post #5:
    Quote Originally Posted by fenglish
    I still don't understand the usage of "of/from which/that", please guide me the correct way to use such words.
    Is the question too complicated for you guys?

  5. #15
    fenglish is offline Member
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    Re: from which it was derived

    Quote Originally Posted by lauralie2 View Post
    The pattern you're dealing with works like this. Either the preposition is left at the end (1) or it is moved closer to its object (2):
    ...
    Is the question too complicated for you guys?
    Thanks.

    The question is not so complicated actually, I just don't know the syntax and when to use it.

    But now I have understood from your detailed explanation, thanks.

  6. #16
    5jj's Avatar
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    Re: from which it was derived

    Quote Originally Posted by lauralie2 View Post
    How absurd. The PO's question is clearly stated in Post #5:Is the question too complicated for you guys?
    Yes Raymott, you really are absurd!
    I expect you thought you were addressing the question in #10, (as did Fenglish, it seems, but that's irrelevant).
    Didn't you realise that 5 comes before 10? Is that too complicated for you?

  7. #17
    Raymott's Avatar
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    Re: from which it was derived

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    Yes Raymott, you really are absurd!
    I expect you thought you were addressing the question in #10, (as did Fenglish, it seems, but that's irrelevant).
    Didn't you realise that 5 comes before 10? Is that too complicated for you?
    Sometimes questions go in a queue and sometimes on a stack. I was applying the Last In/ First Out principle in this case.

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