Results 1 to 9 of 9

    • Join Date: Nov 2010
    • Posts: 1
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #1

    The sound in wa/t/er, la/dd/er, daugh/t/er in US English

    Hi :) Can sb please help me learn how to pronounce that sound? (if it's indeed one sound). Does the tongue move towards the front or backwards? Does it touch right above the teeth? I've no idea how to say it

    Thanks :)

    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • Poland

    • Join Date: Jul 2010
    • Posts: 5,098
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #2

    Re: The sound in wa/t/er, la/dd/er, daugh/t/er in US English

    In US English, it's the sound that you dentote by rho in Greek but pronounced very shortly.

    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • Portuguese
      • Home Country:
      • Brazil
      • Current Location:
      • Germany

    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 309
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #3

    Re: The sound in wa/t/er, la/dd/er, daugh/t/er in US English

    yes...itīs called the flap, and it sounds like the R in red, river..etc..you can hear it and try to imitate it by going to thefreedictionary.com....type in the word in the search box and click on the american flag icon.

    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • Poland

    • Join Date: Jul 2010
    • Posts: 5,098
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #4

    Re: The sound in wa/t/er, la/dd/er, daugh/t/er in US English

    Quote Originally Posted by Avalon View Post
    yes...itīs called the flap, and it sounds like the R in red, river..etc..you can hear it and try to imitate it by going to thefreedictionary.com....type in the word in the search box and click on the american flag icon.
    It's indeed the alveolar flap. But it's not the sound that you hear in "river" or "red" in American English.
    Last edited by birdeen's call; 28-Nov-2010 at 21:57. Reason: Alveolar, not alveoral. Geez.

    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • Portuguese
      • Home Country:
      • Brazil
      • Current Location:
      • Germany

    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 309
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #5

    Re: The sound in wa/t/er, la/dd/er, daugh/t/er in US English

    Quote Originally Posted by birdeen's call View Post
    It's indeed the alveoral flap. But it's not the sound that you hear in "river" or "red" in American English.
    Well, if I say out loud..the water in the river is red..I do think they sound similar enough, though as you say, yes, they are not exactly the SAME sound...the flap would then touch the palate, whereas the river and red wonīt.


    • Join Date: Nov 2010
    • Posts: 1
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #6

    Re: The sound in wa/t/er, la/dd/er, daugh/t/er in US English

    Yes, the sound of the "t" in water, daughter and other words like bitter, or baby sitter is called a flap "r". Unlike the liquid "r", your tounge comes up and hits the roof of your mouth behind your front teeth quickly and comes down again. I don't know Greek but it sounds like the Spanish "r" if the "r" comes in the middle of the sentance like in Barcelona.

  1. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 20,955
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #7

    Re: The sound in wa/t/er, la/dd/er, daugh/t/er in US English

    Quote Originally Posted by Avalon View Post
    Well, if I say out loud..the water in the river is red..I do think they sound similar enough, though as you say, yes, they are not exactly the SAME sound...the flap would then touch the palate, whereas the river and red wonīt.
    They may sound similar when you say them, but the 'r' in 'river' and 'red' is not a flap, or tap. /ɹ/ and /ɾ/are not similar.

    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Nov 2008
    • Posts: 6
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #8

    Re: The sound in wa/t/er, la/dd/er, daugh/t/er in US English

    Retired teacher

    To me these all sound like d.

    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2010
    • Posts: 32
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #9

    Re: The sound in wa/t/er, la/dd/er, daugh/t/er in US English

    Quote Originally Posted by Effie10 View Post
    Hi :) Can sb please help me learn how to pronounce that sound? (if it's indeed one sound). Does the tongue move towards the front or backwards? Does it touch right above the teeth? I've no idea how to say it

    Thanks :)
    Mechanically, the "d" sound of "ladder" makes the tongue move to the front to linger very briefly above the teeth. With the "t" sounds in the other two words, the tongue also moves forward, and it barely touches above the teeth, but with a small, sharp aspiration (or breath) directed at the tip of the tongue so that it sounds slightly less fluid than the "d." Hope that helps too.

Similar Threads

  1. Does this sound OK in English?
    By snade17 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 02-Apr-2008, 15:16
  2. does this sound OK in English
    By snade17 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 26-Mar-2008, 00:16
  3. Does this sound OK in English
    By snade17 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 12-Mar-2008, 10:59
  4. Does this sound OK in English
    By snade17 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 09-Dec-2007, 08:55
  5. Does this sound OK in English?
    By snade17 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 18-May-2007, 23:45

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •