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  1. #11
    Munch's Avatar
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    Default Re: question

    "I am living here for two years" sounds fine to me.

    However - at first I thought it was an error because I have heard learners of English say similar things when they meant "I have lived here for two years."

    You can see for yourself. Do a Google search for "I am living here for" and you will mostly find non-native speakers using the phrase incorrectly, with a sprinkling of native speakers using the phrase (correctly in my opinion) in the manner fivejedjon mentioned.
    Last edited by Munch; 30-Nov-2010 at 08:04.

  2. #12
    corum is offline Banned
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    Default Re: question

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    #1 is grammatical in the sense: This place is my temporary home for a period of two years. Probably some native speakers would use stay rather than live.
    It could also be used with a future sense, though Lauralie's version is more likely to be heard.
    #2 means that I began to live here two days ago, and I still live here.
    I am with Lauralie.

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    #2 means that I began to live here two days ago, and I still live here.
    True, but the progressive present does not collocate with temporal adjuncts such as 'for two years' because the idea of 'around now' would be lost with them.

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    #1 is grammatical in the sense: This place is my temporary home for a period of two years. Probably some native speakers would use stay rather than [I]live.
    Future arising from present arrangement: this is what you mean, right? I have seen the use of the present progressive in this sense only with events with relatively short duration. I think it is the temporal adverbial that puts a spoke in in your argument's wheel.

  3. #13
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    Default Re: question

    Quote Originally Posted by corum View Post
    the progressive present does not collocate with temporal adjuncts such as 'for two years' because the idea of 'around now' would be lost with them.

    Oh, but it can, when the present progressive is used for future arrangement:

    "You had better arrive on time. I'm waiting for two minutes and then I'm leaving. If you're more than two minutes late, hard luck."

    Oher constructions are more likely to be used, but that's posible.


    Future arising from present arrangement: this is what you mean, right? I have seen the use of the present progressive in this sense only with events with relatively short duration.

    I am staying on here for another two years, and then I'm going back to England."

    That appears to me to be acceptable.

    5

  4. #14
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    Default Re: question

    I am staying here for another two years, and then I'm going back to England."

    That appears to me to be acceptable.
    Sounds okay to me too.

    And this?
    I am living here for another two years and then I am going back to England.

    Can't explain why it is not okay to my ears. It is not said very often. Probably that is why. Not very idiomatic.

    Oh, but it can, when the present progressive is used for future arrangement:
    Which I mentioned too.

    'I am living here for two years' can't be used in the sense of 'around now'. That is what I meant.

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