Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 26

Thread: come January

    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Jun 2010
    • Posts: 16,054
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #11

    Re: come January

    Quote Originally Posted by corum View Post

    come = preposition? No?
    YES!

    come

    preposition


    informal
    • when a specified time is reached or event happens:I don‘t think that they’ll be far away from honours come the new season
    (OED)
    Cf 'by January'/'from January'.

    Rover

  1. Frank Antonson's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2009
    • Posts: 1,151
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #12

    Re: come January

    The OED is certainly an impressive source.

    But, I would like to point out that it IS a British source, and in American terminology I have never seen "come" considered to be a preposition -- not that I have looked deeply.

    Probably the OED gives a history and an etymology for that use of "come" -- as well as contexts.

    "From" and "by" are quite different, in that they are never verbs. The prepositions "down" and "off" can sometimes be verbs -- but transitive ones.

    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • Hungarian
      • Home Country:
      • Hungary
      • Current Location:
      • Hungary

    • Join Date: Feb 2010
    • Posts: 1,121
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #13

    Re: come January

    I have never seen "come" considered to be a preposition -- not that I have looked deeply.

    Probably the OED gives a history and an etymology for that use of "come" -- as well as contexts.

    "From" and "by" are quite different, in that they are never verbs.
    Definition of including preposition from Cambridge Dictionary Online: Free English Dictionary and Thesaurus

  2. Frank Antonson's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2009
    • Posts: 1,151
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #14

    Re: come January

    Sorry Corum,

    I don't know what you mean by this.

    In those 11 pages of entries is there something about "come" as a preposition?

    Frank

  3. Frank Antonson's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2009
    • Posts: 1,151
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #15

    Re: come January

    "Harmon and House" describes a class of prepositions that come from verbs, but they always use the "-ing" inflection, e.g. "Regarding this matter" the OED might be wrong.

    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Japan

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 44,225
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #16

    Re: come January

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    YES!



    Rover
    That's interesting- thanks. The SOED doesn't give it as a preposition (unless I have missed it)

  4. Johnson_F's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Dec 2010
    • Posts: 195
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #17

    Re: come January

    " come - when a specified time is reached or event happens: I don‘t think that they’ll be far away from honours come the new season" preposition - informal . This comes from:
    definition of come from Oxford Dictionaries Online


    The 2nd edition of the OED lists 74 senses of 'come' as a verb, none of that word as a preposition.

    In sense 35, 'come' "is used in such phrases as 'come what may, or will'. "
    In sense 36.a, 'come' "is used with a future date following as subject ...'eighteen years old come Martinmas, - come Easter; i.e. let Easter come, when Easter shall come. arch. and dial.
    "

  5. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 20,227
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #18

    Re: come January

    I always assumed 'come' was a past participle here.
    "January having/being come ... "
    This is analogous to "That given ... as in "That given, I think we can all agree", meaning, "Given that ...; Now that that is given ..."
    "Come January ..." = "When January has come ..."
    "Come the revolution, intellectuals will be the first to go" - "Once the revolution has come..."

    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • Hungarian
      • Home Country:
      • Hungary
      • Current Location:
      • Hungary

    • Join Date: Feb 2010
    • Posts: 1,121
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #19

    Re: come January

    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Antonson View Post
    "Harmon and House" describes a class of prepositions that come from verbs, but they always use the "-ing" inflection, e.g. "Regarding this matter" the OED might be wrong.
    Or "Harmon and House".

    http://www.usingenglish.com/forum/as...tml#post686834

  6. Frank Antonson's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2009
    • Posts: 1,151
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #20

    Re: come January

    Yes, Harmon and House may be wrong -- or I may be misunderstanding what they say wrongly.

    I will readily grant you that considering "come" as a preposition easily solves the problem (You could say that that is what it has arrived at). But where did it COME from? What is its etymology? I asked a Latin teacher (whom I respect immensely) about this, and he immediately said "subjunctive" -- even though he was not familiar with the future subjunctive of Portuguese.

    Where do we go from here, in this discussion? I guess I want to see the history of "come" as a preposition. I think I am better prepared to show the history of "Come January" as subjunctive, but it may take way more scholarly activity than I am willing to undertake.

    Frank

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. as slow as molesses in January
    By ostap77 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 26
    Last Post: 06-Nov-2010, 16:19
  2. come if it's in January
    By ostap77 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 19-Oct-2010, 13:40
  3. last January
    By sitifan in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 17-Oct-2010, 14:38
  4. London, 28th January 2010
    By ph2004 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 11-Oct-2010, 09:26
  5. [General] Which is January?Which is a January?
    By Ann in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 14-Mar-2009, 15:15

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •