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Thread: Phonetics

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    #1

    Phonetics

    Hi,
    I wonder what is true about the aspiration of the letter D. Well, I know that the phoneticians write there can´t be any aspiration of lenis consonants (those being voiced like b, d, g, v ...) but on the other hand I can often hear it there.
    I am not sure but maybe it has to do with sth I´ve read once. As far as I can remember it said sth to the intent that only when there is a distinction between two possibilities (I guess) than it is necessary to distinguish them:
    spy (no aspiration) while pie (aspiration present)
    but words like hit, sit or like are said to have no aspiration as they are thus pronounced, even though we can aspirate them as well but the point is both these forms are acceptable so they need not be distinguished.
    What do you think? E. g. I can clearly hear it especially when people talk emphatically: Damn it! (I feel it´s aspirated) as well as at the end of words (again).

  1. Raymott's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Phonetics

    Quote Originally Posted by Kudla View Post
    Hi,
    I wonder what is true about the aspiration of the letter D. Well, I know that the phoneticians write there can´t be any aspiration of lenis consonants (those being voiced like b, d, g, v ...) but on the other hand I can often hear it there.
    I am not sure but maybe it has to do with sth I´ve read once. As far as I can remember it said sth to the intent that only when there is a distinction between two possibilities (I guess) than it is necessary to distinguish them:
    spy (no aspiration) while pie (aspiration present)
    but words like hit, sit or like are said to have no aspiration as they are thus pronounced, even though we can aspirate them as well but the point is both these forms are acceptable so they need not be distinguished.
    What do you think? E. g. I can clearly hear it especially when people talk emphatically: Damn it! (I feel it´s aspirated) as well as at the end of words (again).
    I agree that all plosives can be aspirated. In some languages, eg. Hindi, aspirated /b, d, g / are different letters from non-aspirated /b, d, g /.

    This from Wiki:
    The word 'aspiration' and the aspiration symbol is sometimes used with voiced stops, such as [dʰ]. However, such "voiced aspiration", also known as breathy voice or murmur, is less ambiguously transcribed with dedicated diacritics, either [d̤] or [dʱ].
    Aspiration (phonetics) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    PS: In English we don't do /sb/, /sd/, /sg/

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    #3

    Re: Phonetics

    Thanks a lot!

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    #4

    Re: Phonetics

    As Raymott says, any stop can be aspirated. As voiced ones aren't aspirated in English to make a phonemic distinction most English speakers have stopped bothering to hear the aspiration. For example, I don't hear one in 'Damn', although it doesn't surprise me at all to learn that there is one. You're lucky Your native language's phonology has made you aware of something that most of us English native speakers are not aware of.

    Speakers of, say, Indian English, who may use English as their main language but are immersed in a linguistic environment in which - in other languages - [d] is distinctively aspirated - would also be able to hear this. (When a child first learns its own language, it learns to ignore phonetic distinctions that are not meaning-bearing. In time, they grow to be unable to hear those distinctions, though if taught (in a Phonetics course, say) they can repair the damage - to an extent.

    b

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    #5

    Re: Phonetics

    Thanks, I find your comment interesting, though I think it is logical and I myself can think of sth similar in my native tongue.

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    #6

    Re: Phonetics

    This phonetics!!!!

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    #7

    Re: Phonetics

    Hello Kudla,

    Every sound is produced with air that travels from the lungs, up through the windpipe, through the glottis (the space between the vocal folds) and then out through the mouth or the nose.

    With some sounds, the sound of air is quite noticeable depending on how the air flow is impeded (e.g., p, k, t), and with other sounds not as noticeable (e.g., d, b, g), but the release of air is there and audible.

    In "damn" you hear residual air, not aspiration, which is what you're hearing, as well, at the end of words. It's residual air, nothing more, not aspiration.

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    #8

    Re: Phonetics

    I think you're using 'aspiration' in a sense different from that used by me and Raymott.

    b

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    #9

    Re: Phonetics

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    I think you're using 'aspiration' in a sense different from that used by me and Raymott.

    b
    Most definitely.

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    #10

    Re: Phonetics

    Thank you all for enlightening this to me!
    I also wondered how do you deal with some clusters of consonants at the end of one word and beginning of the other e.g.:
    I met that kind boy - I mean how do you actually pronounce such a sentence? I have read that some speakers make use of the assimilation of place and say sth like I meth thak kinb boy (sorry for not using IPA) - i.e. the last consonant of these words is pronounced as the first one of the following (I think that in practice the air is obstructed for a short time with the tongue prepared to utter th, k and b respectively before it is released).
    While others (as I´ve read) put the tongue to such a position to pronounce the last consonant of such words but before the air is released they stop for a very short moment - the so-called glottal stop and instead of the final consonant they quickly change the position of tongue so as to utter the initial consonant of the next word - so the final consonant is not aspirated.
    Could you let me know what you think about this?
    Thanks

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