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Thread: Phonetics

  1. #11
    BobK's Avatar
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    Default Re: Phonetics

    Broadly, you're right. In speech that is not carefully enunciated, people do say /kaɪm'bɒɪ/; in a related change (but the /n/ is 'assimilating' to the closing of the mouth at the end of a conversation), many people say, for example, /faɪm/ as they're leaving a room - though they're probably not aware of it; whereas they would say faɪn/ if they were going on to say '....that's what we'll do.'

    Your second paragraph is closer to the mark about the 'met the' assimilation, though I'd have said 'so the final consonant is not released'. As lauralie2 says, that's not aspiration - it's just what happens to the residual air.

    b

  2. #12
    Kudla is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: Phonetics

    Youre right! Release is the word I was looking for.
    As for the pairs of words or individual words like:
    Good night, had not, hadnt, eaten, rednote
    I have read that the former consonant (t,d) is released as the nasal explosion (the soft palate is lowered) so that the tip of the tongue rests on the alveolar ridge all the time during the articulation of the sequence t (d) + n. In that case the same applies to the inderlined part in "a long handled knife" (as also the latteral explosion is present here).
    But is it also standard to pronounce them separately - t (d) aspirated + n? I have read that it is not but I ask because for me it is quite demanding and if Im not not aware of it the best I can think of is that I form t (d) with the soft palate raised to obstruct the air flow and when I should release it through the nose all I do is just articulate "n" when the soft palate is lowered. I think this is not the correct pronunciation either, or is it?
    I think there are also examples where no nasal explsion is present like "London" is it right?
    What about k + n is the nasal explosion present here as well? I find it even more difficult to pronounce and would rather aspirate the former consonant. I have also heard that in some words such as "bacon" I can even pronounce the sylabic velar variant of "n". What do you think?
    Thank you very much!

  3. #13
    Kudla is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: Phonetics

    Could anyone answer my question(s), please?
    Thank you!

  4. #14
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    Default Re: Phonetics

    Quote Originally Posted by Kudla View Post
    Could anyone answer my question(s), please?
    Thank you!
    I might try if you would ask one question per thread.

  5. #15
    Kudla is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: Phonetics

    Fair enough.
    In the word eaten is it a standard pronunciation to aspirate the T or do I have to create the nasal explosion?
    Thanks

  6. #16
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    Default Re: Phonetics

    Quote Originally Posted by Kudla View Post
    Fair enough.
    In the word eaten is it a standard pronunciation to aspirate the T or do I have to create the nasal explosion?
    Thanks
    In my moderately conservative southern British RP pronunciation, /t/ is not aspirated; there is homorganic nasal release.

  7. #17
    Kudla is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: Phonetics

    but in the word London it is not the case - possibly due to the sequence /nasal+stop+nasal/, right?

  8. #18
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    Default Re: Phonetics

    Quote Originally Posted by Kudla View Post
    but in the word London it is not the case - possibly due to the sequence /nasal+stop+nasal/, right?
    In my moderately conservative southern British RP pronunciation, I am not aware of any aspiration in /d/; I always have a schwa between /d/ and /n./

  9. #19
    Kudla is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: Phonetics

    Thanks, I have supposed so.
    As for the word bacon, what are the possible pronunciations - Ive read that the N sound can be, apart form alveolar, also released as a velar syllabic N. What do you think?

  10. #20
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    Default Re: Phonetics

    Quote Originally Posted by Kudla View Post
    Thanks, I have supposed so.
    As for the word bacon, what are the possible pronunciations - Ive read that the N sound can be, apart form alveolar, also released as a velar syllabic N. What do you think?
    Sorry about the delayed response - have been on holiday for a few days. I think you are right; it is also sometimes partly devoiced in such words as bacon and thicken and may approach /ŋ/.

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