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  1. #1
    masterding is offline Member
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    Default comparative and superlative form

    I often see sentences like "she is more pretty ,more cute, more free and so on ",which seem grammatically wrong ,but many natives use it this way,I wonder if the rules of comparative and superlative form are less strict in modern english?

    thanks.

  2. #2
    TheParser is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: comparative and superlative form

    Quote Originally Posted by masterding View Post
    I often see sentences like "she is more pretty ,more cute, more free and so on ",which seem grammatically wrong ,but many natives use it this way,I wonder if the rules of comparative and superlative form are less strict in modern english?

    thanks.

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    Masterding,


    You have brought up an excellent point.

    (1) Mesdames Celce-Murcia and Larsen-Freeman in their The Grammar Book

    remind us that:

    the basic form of the comparative is more and the

    -er forms are surface lexical manifestations of

    more + adjective/adverb.

    If I understand correctly what those scholars wrote,

    more is always theoretically "correct," but many times

    idiom (the way most natives speak) requires or prefers the

    -er form. (For example -- this is I speaking, not those

    two scholars -- if you say "This is more good," that is not

    "bad" English, but native speakers have decided that in this

    case, "This is better" should be used.)

    (2) Remember, too, that sometimes you have a choice.

    The particular writer may prefer the sound of either more

    or -er.

    Tom is politer than Martha.

    Tom is more polite than Martha. (Quite possibly, this sentence

    might seem more formal and elegant than the other sentence.)

    (3) And remember that Mr. Michael Swan in his Practical English

    Usage reminds us that occasionally we must use more:

    He is more lazy than stupid.

    (English "ears" will not accept: He is lazier than stupid.)


    Thank you & have a nice day

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