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  1. #1
    on the way is offline Member
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    Question "The stop of us will be un-twoable".What's the meaning of it?

    This is a line in an episode of a TV series "Miranda".The context is that Miranda and her friend Stevie are mobilizing themselves to beat a girl who mockingly say they are old.I know there isn't such a word as un-twoable,but I'm still very curious to know what Miranda means with this utterance.Your help will be much appreciated.

  2. #2
    ~Mav~ is offline Member
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    Lightbulb Re: "The stop of us will be un-twoable".What's the meaning of it?

    Quote Originally Posted by on the way View Post
    This is a line in an episode of a TV series "Miranda".The context is that Miranda and her friend Stevie are mobilizing themselves to beat a girl who mockingly say they are old.I know there isn't such a word as un-twoable,but I'm still very curious to know what Miranda means with this utterance.Your help will be much appreciated.

    *** NOT A TEACHER ***

    In my humble opinion, it is a sort of pun. Consider this, "two of us will be unstoppable". I sense I make hope. I mean, I hope I make sense.

  3. #3
    on the way is offline Member
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    Default Re: "The stop of us will be un-twoable".What's the meaning of it?

    Quote Originally Posted by ~Mav~ View Post
    *** NOT A TEACHER ***

    In my humble opinion, it is a sort of pun. Consider this, "two of us will be unstoppable". I sense I make hope. I mean, I hope I make sense.
    Brilliant!Thank you very very much.It makes sense now.

  4. #4
    Rover_KE is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: "The stop of us will be un-twoable".What's the meaning of it?

    Quote Originally Posted by ~Mav~ View Post
    *** NOT A TEACHER ***

    In my humble opinion, it is a sort of pun. Consider this, "two of us will be unstoppable". I sense I make hope. I mean, I hope I make sense.
    Well spotted, Mav. I hadn't noticed that.

    (To be picky, it's a spoonerism, not a pun.)

    Rover

  5. #5
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    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: "The stop of us will be un-twoable".What's the meaning of it?

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    Well spotted, Mav. I hadn't noticed that.

    (To be picky, it's a spoonerism, not a pun.)

    Rover
    I thought Spoonerisms involved the transposition of only the initial phonemes of the words involved. The most popular one I can recall is ascribed to the Reverend Doctor himself: 'You have tasted two worms, and must leave on the next town drain.'

    I don't know what whole morpheme transpositions are called. One popular in my family is 'The thick plottens'.

    b

  6. #6
    Rover_KE is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: "The stop of us will be un-twoable".What's the meaning of it?

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:

    A spoonerism is an error in speech or deliberate play on words in which corresponding consonants, vowels, or morphemes are switched.
    Rover

  7. #7
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: "The stop of us will be un-twoable".What's the meaning of it?

    Yes, I worded my objection wrongly . My restricting it to phonemes was wrong. Such a distinction is worth making though, I think. The Wikipedia definition doesn't (explicitly) extend to whole words ('two' and 'stop'), although it does by implication as the two words in question are both monophonemic.

    b

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