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  1. #1
    ostap77 is offline Key Member
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    Default there+many people

    I guess e2e4 is going to say that it's messed up again. Let's wait what native speakers say, shall we??!!!


    1)"He said there's going to be many people waiting for us at the conference hall."

    OR

    2)"He said that many people are going to be waiting for us at the conference hall."

    Does 1) sound OK? There wouldn't be any difference between these two for me?
    Last edited by ostap77; 13-Dec-2010 at 19:50.

  2. #2
    2006 is offline Banned
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    Default Re: there+many people

    Quote Originally Posted by ostap77 View Post
    I guess e2e4 is going to say that it's messed up again. Let's wait what native speakers say, shall we??!!!


    1)"He said there's going to be many people waiting for us at the conference hall."
    'He said there are going to be......'

    2)"He said that many people are going to be waiting for us at the conference hall."

    Does 1) sound OK?
    There wouldn't be any difference between these two for me? That is not a correct question. Try again.
    2006

  3. #3
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: there+many people

    Technically, 1 is incorrect, but it's something may native speakers will say, in the UK at least. It's a colloquial form, but it's very common in some areas- I hear that sort of thing a lot in London, where you'll hear things like There's two things I have to say.... However, this is non-standard and will be considered wrong by many.

    I guess e2e4 is going to say that it's messed up again. Let's wait what native speakers say, shall we??!!!
    Starting a thread with this is basically inviting trouble, so please don't do it. Start a discussion as a discussion and not an invitation to fight, please.

  4. #4
    Raymott's Avatar
    Raymott is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: there+many people

    Quote Originally Posted by ostap77 View Post
    1)"He said there's going to be many people waiting for us at the conference hall."

    OR

    2)"He said that many people are going to be waiting for us at the conference hall."

    Does 1) sound OK? There wouldn't any difference between these two for me?
    Sentence 1. is normal in AusE, as is sentence 2.
    It's an interesting point of grammar, and I note that different languages cope differently with it.
    Spanish has one word; hay. Hay un ombre; Hay dos hombres. ("There's one man; There's/there're two men").
    Il y a in French can mean either: Il ya a un homme; Il y a deux hommes.
    Es gibt is used for both in German.
    On the other hand, Italian has c and ci sono. C' un uomo; Ci sono due uomini.
    So, I don't think there's any grammatical reason why English shouldn't use "There's" as both singular and plural. And in fact, many of us do.

  5. #5
    Barb_D's Avatar
    Barb_D is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: there+many people

    Just in case you didn't notice this, however, all of these are about "There's" in a contracted form. I would suggest that the native speakers who are comfortable using "there's" for a plural subject [and I am one of them] would not use "There is..." but rather "There are..." in the non-contracted form.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  6. #6
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: there+many people

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    Just in case you didn't notice this, however, all of these are about "There's" in a contracted form. I would suggest that the native speakers who are comfortable using "there's" for a plural subject [and I am one of them] would not use "There is..." but rather "There are..." in the non-contracted form.

    I think the fact that it's easier to say could affect things.

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