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  1. #1
    TheParser is offline VIP Member
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    Diagramming "let."

    In the "Ask a Teacher" forum, we have been having a most interesting

    discussion about this sentence:

    Let him who is without sin cast the first stone.

    Would you please Reed-Kellogg it?

    A MILLION thanks!!!

  2. #2
    Frank Antonson's Avatar
    Frank Antonson is offline Senior Member
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    Re: Diagramming "let."


  3. #3
    corum is offline Banned
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    Re: Diagramming "let."

    On a scale extendig from true auxiliaries to true main verbs are catenatives, the neighbors of main verbs. I suspect 'let' is one of the boys. Let us see some tests:

    1. It has a meaning related to modality or aspect.
    2. It satisfies the "independence of subject" criterion:

    Let me go.
    Let it flow.

    3. Catenative constructions are in no way syntactically related to transitive
    verb constructions in which the verb is followed by a direct object or
    prepositional object.

    Let him cast the stone.
    Allow him to cast the stone.
    Let him the casting of stone.
    Allow him the casting of stone.

    "Let" is even less catenative than "allow".


    Quirk et. al. says:
    Let them go! -- "let = pragmatic particle of imperative mood
    May you be happy. -- "may" = pragmatic particle of optative mood

    Same syntax:
    Let him (to) cast the stone.
    Allow him to cast the stone.

    SVOC --> complex transitive verb.

    I fully agree with Frank's diagram.

  4. #4
    Frank Antonson's Avatar
    Frank Antonson is offline Senior Member
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    Re: Diagramming "let."

    So many big words!

    I just learned that "Let..." used like that is an example of the imperative, with a "you" understood, as in a command.

    The objective complement is not something one automatically looks for.

    Thanks, Corum.

  5. #5
    TheParser is offline VIP Member
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    Re: Diagramming "let."

    Thank you very much, gentlemen, for your replies.

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