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    #1

    closings, memo--legal terms

    Hi,

    I am wondering if anyone happens to know the two (legal) terms in the following context?

    "The only crime Peter committed, " I argue, "is quoting from a movie as sappy as Love Story."
    "Objection, " the prosecutor says, "Are we doing closings now? Because nobody sent me the memo."

    Thank you very much for your kind help.

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    #2

    Re: closings, memo--legal terms

    It refers to the closing argument/statement: Closing argument - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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    #3

    Re: closings, memo--legal terms

    A memo is a note/reminder.

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    #4

    Re: closings, memo--legal terms

    Quite often in corporations or business situations, a "memo" is the main method of communication. For example, if the company is having an employee picnic to which everyone is invited, the employees would be notified by a company memo. Likewise, if the parking lot is being re-paved and will be inaccessible for a few days, that information will also be passed along via memo. So it has become something of a corporate joke when something out of the ordinary happens or something that goes against company policy for a person to state "I didn't get the memo."

    For example, if an employee in a very formal, prestigious firm arrives for work dressed in blue jeans (for whatever reason; maybe all his suits are at the cleaners), a co-worker might remark: "Oh, I guess I didn't get the memo; I didn't know that today was Casual Dress Day."

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