Results 1 to 3 of 3
  1. #1
    tbentsen77 is offline Newbie
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • Danish
      • Home Country:
      • Denmark
      • Current Location:
      • Denmark
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    26
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default s' or s's in possesive forms?

    As I have come to understand, today it's equally legal to use the s' and s's solution when dealing with possesive forms.

    For example: Chris' dog / Chris's dog.

    But what about the situations where we are not dealing with a name? In this case, I would definetely go with the s' option - but is the other one gramatically incorrect?

    For example: The two boys' mother / The two boys's mother
    All the girls' dolls / All the girls's dolls

    Please don't misunderstand me, but I'd very much appreciate anwers based on solid grammatical rules rather than "I prefer"-argumetations.

    Thank you in advance.

    Kind regards
    Tbentsen

  2. #2
    SoothingDave is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    9,851
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: s' or s's in possesive forms?

    The rule you were given was for names that end in "s."

    Plural forms of words, like "boys" form the possessive by adding an apostrophe. "Boys' toys" not "boys's toys."

  3. #3
    mykwyner is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    2,047
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: s' or s's in possesive forms?

    The rule is that plurals of regular common nouns that are formed with an s become possessives with only an apostrophe.

    The boy's mother was home. (one boy, one mother)

    The boys' mother was home. (more than one boy, one mother)

    When you are making possessives out of common nouns that end in s in the singular, the rule is the same.

    The pants' zipper is broken. standard
    The pants's zipper is broken. non-standard (We don't say "pants-ez zipper")

Similar Threads

  1. s's
    By Unregistered in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 24-Jun-2008, 21:59
  2. Possesive'
    By Arushin in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 23-Apr-2008, 03:38
  3. possesive
    By Unregistered in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 02-Apr-2007, 00:29
  4. possesive - questions
    By jirikoo in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 13-Sep-2006, 08:33
  5. s' vs s's ?
    By forum_mail in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 09-Mar-2006, 03:09

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •