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    #1

    ain't like I ...

    Hi

    One guy says that he doesn't go to the library, he doesn't watch TV, doesn't go to the cinema. He says: I prefer to stay at home. Ain't like I got nowhere to go.

    Does it mean: It doesn't mean I've got nowhere to go OR just the opposite: Looks like I've got nowhere to go.

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    #2

    Re: ain't like I ...

    In standard American English it would be: It isn't like I have nowhere to go.

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    #3

    Re: ain't like I ...

    Hi

    So he actually has somewhere to go?

    thanks

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    #4

    Re: ain't like I ...

    Yes. More simply, "I do have places to go."

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: ain't like I ...

    I disagree.

    He says at home because he has nowhere to go. It's a non-standard double negation, just like his "ain't" is not standard either. I assume the person is not supposed to be very well educated?

    Typical tv/movie speech patterns for non-educated characters:
    I don't know nothing about that = I don't know anything about that. = I know nothing about that.
    I ain't got nothing more to say about that = I don't have anything more to say = I have nothing more to say.

    I ain't got nowhere to go =I don't have anywhere to go = I have nowhere to go. (That's why I stay home.)
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #6

    Re: ain't like I ...

    I was thinking about this double negation.

    So actually he has nowhere to go :)

    Good to know.

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    #7

    Re: ain't like I ...

    First of all, the use of non-standard English is not an indicator of a poor education. Many English speakers, myself included, are capable of switching registers depending on the situation.

    Second of all, this is not a case of double negation. Substitute isn't for ain't and the sentence still has the same meaning.

    Standard English: It is not as if I had nowhere to go.

    The phrase, "I got nowhere to go," is negated by the phrase, "It ain't like," which creates the meaning, "I do have somewhere to go."

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    #8

    Re: ain't like I ...

    I agree with Barb. It's more likely to be a double negation. But either way, it doesn't make sense to me. The previous sentences describe neither a person with nowhere to go, nor a person with lots of places to go.

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    #9

    Re: ain't like I ...

    In the regional dialect used where I live (southeastern United States) the meaning of this statement is clear to me.

    "I do have places to go, but I prefer to stay home."

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    #10

    Re: ain't like I ...

    Quote Originally Posted by mykwyner View Post
    In the regional dialect used where I live (southeastern United States) the meaning of this statement is clear to me.

    "I do have places to go, but I prefer to stay home."
    And I think it wouldn't have made any sense if he'd meant, "I don't have any place to go." If he'd meant that, he wouldn't have said that he preferred to stay home. What for? His preference wouldn't have mattered. He must have meant what mykwyner suggests I think.

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