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Thread: /j/

  1. #11
    thatone is offline Member
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    Default Re: /j/

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    No.
    The semi-vowel /j/ is considered a distinct phoneme, as are the vowels /i(:)/ and /I/
    /ʌnɪən/ is not the same as /ʌnjən/
    /j/ technically is a not a vowel, so in words like onion it is basically a /ɪ/ followed by a vowel.

  2. #12
    lauralie2 is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: /j/

    Quote Originally Posted by devonpham1998 View Post
    But what is the difference between /i/ and /I/?
    Listen to the difference here. Scroll down to "Audio samples".

  3. #13
    okkttsk is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: /j/

    Quote Originally Posted by devonpham1998 View Post
    I have a question. Why the /j/ in "university" /ju:nɪ'vɜ:sətɪ/ is pronunced "J" but the /j/ in "onion" /'ʌnjən/ is pronunced "i"? Why "onion" is not /'ʌnɪən/?
    Not sure if you had people answer you clearly.

    /j/ is a semi-vowel. It's produced from the tip of the tongue, but it has the characteristic of a consonant.

    /i/ is exactly a full vowel--giving an extra syllable.

    When you pronounce /ju:nɪ'vɜ:sətɪ/, the tip of the tongue slides from /i/ position to /u/ position.

    Some old dictionary used to give the pronunciation with /'ʌnjən/ because of the blend of /i/ and /ə/. However, if you give the pronunciation of /'ʌnɪən/, the word is divided into 3 syllables, rather than 2.

    Hope that helps.

  4. #14
    okkttsk is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: /j/

    Quote Originally Posted by devonpham1998 View Post
    But what is the difference between /i/ and /I/?
    If you study the RP, you will find out that some speakers distinguish the /i/, /I/ and /i:/.

    The IPA uses /i/ in diphthongs, such as /iә/ or /aiә/. I can't recall most of the excerpt from those books, but you might want to search publications by Oxford or Cambridge, esp. those older than 1990s.

    Nowadays many RP speakers only pronounce /i:/ and /I/.

    Oh, and I forget. Words in plural, such as cases or passes, are used to be represented as /'keisIz/ and /'pɑ:sIz/ for the RP, but for Americans, they use the /'keisәz/ and /'pæ:sәz/

  5. #15
    devonpham1998's Avatar
    devonpham1998 is offline Junior Member
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    Smile Re: /j/

    It seems to be hard to distinguish the vowels. I will try to find out more about it. Anyway, thank to all of you! :)

    D

  6. #16
    Raymott's Avatar
    Raymott is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: /j/

    Quote Originally Posted by okkttsk View Post
    The IPA uses /i/ in diphthongs, such as /iә/ or /aiә/.
    Did you mean that IPA uses /ɪ/ in those positions?
    ə/ as in 'here', /aɪə/ as in 'fire', etc.

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