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Thread: Enjoin

  1. #1
    Allen165 is offline Key Member
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    Default Enjoin

    I am not sure about the usage of "enjoin," which is contronym because it has two opposite meanings. Are the following sentences correct?

    "X was enjoined from returning to class." (=X was prohibited from returning to class)

    "X was enjoined to return to class." (=X was ordered to return to class)

    "X enjoined me from returning to class."

    "X enjoined me to return to class."

    Thanks!

  2. #2
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    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: Enjoin

    Quote Originally Posted by Jasmin165 View Post
    I am not sure about the usage of "enjoin," which is contronym because it has two opposite meanings. Are the following sentences correct?

    "X was enjoined from returning to class." (=X was prohibited from returning to class)

    "X was enjoined to return to class." (=X was ordered to return to class). Close, but not quite.

    ...
    I think 'ordered' is a bit too forceful; I'd use something less strident, like 'called upon [+ to-infinitive]'.

    Incidentally, 'enjoined' is quite a rare word - to the extent that I may have got the meaning wrong! (You can use a dictionary as well as I can. If you do, let me know if I'm wrong.)

    b

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    Allen165 is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: Enjoin

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    I think 'ordered' is a bit too forceful; I'd use something less strident, like 'called upon [+ to-infinitive]'.

    Incidentally, 'enjoined' is quite a rare word - to the extent that I may have got the meaning wrong! (You can use a dictionary as well as I can. If you do, let me know if I'm wrong.)

    b
    If you google "enjoined from," you'll get plenty of results, some of which seem legitimate (e.g., Defendants are enjoined from marketing generic cinacalcet hydrochloride tablets : Delaware Patent Litigation Report).

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    Default Re: Enjoin

    Quote Originally Posted by Jasmin165 View Post
    If you google "enjoined from," you'll get plenty of results, some of which seem legitimate (e.g., Defendants are enjoined from marketing generic cinacalcet hydrochloride tablets : Delaware Patent Litigation Report).
    Aha - that's a specialist term used by lawyers, when an 'injunction' has been issued. When an injunction is issued, the court says, in effect, 'We call upon you to stop doing X'. When a company wants someone to 'cease and desist', they ask the court for an injunction. In legal reports, and sloppy journalism, the person so ordered can be said to be 'enjoined from' doing X'. But in any other case, the sense of 'enjoin' is positive, and it should be followed by 'to'; I'd go so far as to say that 'enjoined from' should only be used - if at all - when there has been a formal injunction.

    b

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