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  1. #1
    keannu's Avatar
    keannu is offline Key Member
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    Default "I haven't heard from my cousin in ten years"??

    Is it possible to say "I haven't heard from my cousin in ten years."
    I guess in should be replaced by "for".
    I saw this sentence in a grammer book, but it doesn't seem to make sense as "in" means "after".

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    Jaskin is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: "I haven't heard from my cousin in ten years"??

    hi,
    please note I'm not a teacher nor a native speaker;

    As far as I know it's correct and acceptable;
    in means after for the future meaning. In your example it is the same as for .
    in:
    3. Expressing a period of time during which an event takes place or a situation remains the case
    they met in 1885
    at one o'clock in the morning
    I hadn't seen him in years

    4. Expressing the length of time before a future event is expected to take place
    I'll see you in fifteen minutes

    Cheers

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    birdeen's call is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: "I haven't heard from my cousin in ten years"??


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    Smile Re: "I haven't heard from my cousin in ten years"??

    Oxford says that in is used in negative sentences or after first, last, etc. meaning for (a particular period of time):
    I haven't seen him in years.
    It's the first letter I've had in ten days.

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    2006 is offline Banned
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    Default Re: "I haven't heard from my cousin in ten years"??

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    Is it possible to say "I haven't heard from my cousin in ten years." yes, absolutely
    I guess in should be replaced by "for".
    I saw this sentence in a grammar book, but it doesn't seem to make sense as "in" means "after".

    No, "in" only means 'after' when you are talking about the future.
    It will be reviewed in ten years.


    2006
    Last edited by 2006; 17-Jan-2011 at 04:49.

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