Results 1 to 3 of 3
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    101
    Post Thanks / Like

    Love in the gerund???

    Hello,
    I have been to Macdonald's and I read the following sentence:

    " I'm loving it".

    I have always learned that "love" cannot be used in the present continuous.

    Can you help me understand why they wrote the sentence this way????

    Thank you so much.

  2. #2
    Steven D's Avatar
    Steven D is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    834
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Love in the gerund???

    Quote Originally Posted by Emanuelli
    Hello,
    I have been to Macdonald's and I read the following sentence:

    " I'm loving it".

    I have always learned that "love" cannot be used in the present continuous.

    Can you help me understand why they wrote the sentence this way????

    Thank you so much.

    First, it's not a gerund. It's a participle. Gerunds, in English, function as nouns, while participles which end in "ing" function as progressive verbs. (there are past particples of course, which end in "ed")

    This is true. The verb "love" is a stative verb. This, of course, means it should not be used as a progressive verb (for the most part).

    Using "love" progressively makes the sentence sound stronger and more emphatic. Some native speakers of English use "like" progressively as well. This is not standard, but it's a way of expressing oneself. Most speakers would recognize this as "informal" and not use it when they have to make a good impression on someone. The manner in which we speak, of course, has much to do with the impression we make.

    Though for the most part they do, it seems that we can't always rely on native speakers of English to carefully follow rules of grammar as defined in ESL/EFL books. This turns out to be somewhat noticeable in advertising I'd say. I read and hear things in advertising that I know are not correct, though not too often. Advertisers choose language of this type for promotional purposes. It can be effective in conveying their message to the public.

    If you hear someone use "like" or "love" progressively, it doesn't necessarily mean that he or she has poor language skills. I would say many people are capable of switching back and forth from less standard and informal manners of speaking to more standard and formal manners of speaking. Of course, there are those that are stuck in "informal and nonstandard" and those that are stuck in "formal and standard". Many people can switch back and forth. However, in so doing, they don't think of going from correct language to incorrect language. It has more to do with changing one's style of speaking to suit the circumstance. Most people speak language that is correct in standard English while remaining somewhere in the middle of "formal" and "informal". Most spoken language can be thought of as informal, but still correct and standard.

    I'm not one that takes a conservative view of English grammar. However, I don't particularly care for using "like" and "love" progressively. It just doesn't sound right to me, and, as precribed by grammar rules, it is not right. Still, I can't say I'd be critical of anyone who does this. Just be careful with it. A native speaker that uses "like" and "love" progressively will probably sound natural, though it could very well simply sound wrong. It depends on who's listening. It might not sound so "natural" coming from one who speaks English as a foreign or second language. It might sound more like an error made by one who is learning the language. It would depend on how native-like one's pronunciation is.

    Still, I can't say I'd be critical of anyone who does. <<

    I once heard someone use "like" progressively in conversation. This person happened to be an ESL teacher who was in the habit of teaching students that they must use "may" and not "can" for requests and permission. First, that's wrong. Second, it's hypocritical. One shouldn't be teaching one's preference for the most formal language as being the "only thing that is correct" and then speak in a way that is most definitely nonstandard, incorrect, and quite informal. This is something to be critical of. One can certainly use "can" for permission and a request, and it's far more common than using "may". Using "may" might simply sound more polite on occasion. One can certainly say using "like" progressively is incorrect.
    Last edited by Steven D; 02-Aug-2005 at 22:15. Reason: typo

  3. #3
    Steven D's Avatar
    Steven D is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    834
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Love in the gerund???

    participle (pahr-tuh-sip-uhl)

    The verb form that combines with an auxiliary verb to indicate certain tenses.

    The present participle is formed by adding -ing to the infinitive; it indicates present action: “The girl is swimming”; “I am thinking.” (Compare gerund.)

    http://www.answers.com/participle


    ger·und (jĕr'ənd)
    n.
    In Latin, a noun derived from a verb and having all case forms except the nominative.
    In other languages, a verbal noun analogous to the Latin gerund, such as the English form ending in -ing when used as a noun, as in singing in We admired the choir's singing.

    http://www.answers.com/main/ntquery?...inktext=gerund

Similar Threads

  1. expressions about love
    By ripley in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 20-Dec-2004, 01:30
  2. unrequited love
    By Joe in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 17-May-2004, 21:34
  3. Love Online--corrections and suggestions
    By Joe in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 06-Mar-2004, 03:20
  4. Replies: 4
    Last Post: 31-Jul-2003, 01:58

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •