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  1. #1
    vil is offline VIP Member
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    to get a bang out of something

    Dear teachers,

    Would you tell me your opinion about the interpretations of the expression in bold in the following sentences?

    They got a bang out of things, thought – in a half-asset way, mean it mean.

    You could tell old Spencer’d got a big bang out of buying it.

    to get a bang out of something = derive pleasure from something

    I really got a bang out of that hat.

    I get a bang imitating them.

    That stuff gives me a bang sometimes.

    Thanks for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V

  2. #2
    azcl is offline Member
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    Re: to get a bang out of something

    ***Not a teacher***

    To 'get a bang out of' something is not a phrase I have ever heard anybody use in the UK. I can see from the dictionary that it is a valid expression, but I am not sure whether it is a common term in the US (any AmE native speakers care to comment?)

    In the UK, you are more likely to say something 'went off with a bang' - presumably a reference to fireworks - 'The party went off with a bang' or just 'The party went with a bang' means it was a really good time.

    From the dictionary, it looks as if 'get a bang out of' means what you suggest - i.e. to get pleasure from something.

    You also need to be a bit careful, as 'bang' also has a slang/vulgar meaning in some contexts, so 'I got a big bang out of the evening with her' might raise a few eyebrows

    Ade

  3. #3
    vil is offline VIP Member
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    Re: to get a bang out of something

    Hi azcl,

    Both sentences with the expression in question are from "The Catcher In the Rye" by S.D. Salinger.

    Thank you for your kindness.

    Thank you also for your recommendations.

    V.

  4. #4
    azcl is offline Member
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    Re: to get a bang out of something

    ***Not a teacher***

    As he is an American author, perhaps 'get a bang out of' is more of an AmE than BrE expression, which would explain why it doesn't seem common in the UK.

    Ade

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