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  1. #1
    nyota's Avatar
    nyota is offline Senior Member
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    Default don't catch me in my words

    a) Don't catch me in my words, I didn't mean to bash him. I was merely saying that...
    b) Don't pick on my words, ...

    Is b) correct? I mean, does it sound ok and is it actually used? Any other ways in which you can express the same idea?

  2. #2
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    Default Re: don't catch me in my words

    To pick on is to criticize unfairly. To bash is to criticize severely. You seem to be saying, "Don't criticize my criticism of him...", which is a little odd. I'd say, "Don't over-interpret my words. I don't mean to criticize him severely..."

  3. #3
    nyota's Avatar
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    Default Re: don't catch me in my words

    I just meant to ask if the phrase 'don't pick on my words' is actually correct

  4. #4
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    Default Re: don't catch me in my words

    To pick on is to "single out" a person for blame. "To pick on my words" is not grammatically incorrect, but it doesn't make much sense to me without further elaboration. "Don't pick on me" is used more often.

  5. #5
    nyota's Avatar
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    Default Re: don't catch me in my words

    Okay, thanks syku

    Any other ways of telling somebody 'not to catch me in my words'?

  6. #6
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    Default Re: don't catch me in my words

    Don't read more into this than what I actually said. Don't try to read between the lines.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: don't catch me in my words

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    Don't read more into this than what I actually said. Don't try to read between the lines.
    Sometimes it's necessary to point out that someone is really trying sort of "catch" someone else's words, trying to attract the attention of others to some different meaning of what was said and so annoy the speaker. "Don't try to read between the lines" doesn't express this annoyance of the speaker. Perhaps, there is one more way to say that you are annoyed by the fact that someone is trying to "catch your words"?

  8. #8
    The Dude is offline Member
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    Default Re: don't catch me in my words

    You could try any of these:

    Don't try to catch me out
    Don't try to trip me up
    Don't (deliberately) misunderstand me
    Don't misinterpret what I'm saying
    Don't get me wrong

    Or, to be diplomatic:

    Perhaps I didn't express myself very well...

    Take your pick!

  9. #9
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    Default Re: don't catch me in my words

    Quote Originally Posted by english-help.okis.ru View Post
    Sometimes it's necessary to point out that someone is really trying sort of "catch" someone else's words, trying to attract the attention of others to some different meaning of what was said and so annoy the speaker. "Don't try to read between the lines" doesn't express this annoyance of the speaker. Perhaps, there is one more way to say that you are annoyed by the fact that someone is trying to "catch your words"?
    To me it sounds similar to Don't put words in my mouth. It can be use when someone takes part of what you've said, comes up with a different meaning, and then implies or outright says that it was what you meant. Usually the expression is said with some degree of annoyance because for the most part someone is trying to manipulate (vs misunderstand) what you are saying i.e. lawyers

    It is often followed with "I never said that", or "that's not what I meant" or "you're mixing my words around".

    Catch, is used in reference to hearing something like "I didn't catch what he said."

    Hope this helps (rather than confuses) :)

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