Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    BigMak is offline Newbie
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Assamese
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • India
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    20
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default "Me going to Africa" or "My going to Africa"

    Which one of the following two sentences is correct?

    1. "It isn't the question of me going to Africa", said the new manager, "only of whom I should go with".

    2. "It isn't the question of my going to Africa", said the new manager, "only of whom I should go with".
    Last edited by BigMak; 23-Jan-2011 at 15:35. Reason: Correcting grammatical mistake in my question.

  2. #2
    Richard1 is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    203
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: "Me going to Africa" or "My going to Africa"

    Quote Originally Posted by BigMak View Post
    Which one of the following two sentences is correct?

    1. "It isn't the question of me going to Africa", said the new manager, "only of whom I should go with".

    2. "It isn't the question of my going to Africa", said the new manager, "only of whom I should go with".
    Hi,

    Number 2
    However the, "only of whom I should go with" doesn't make sense. What is it meant to be indicating?

  3. #3
    mykwyner is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    2,047
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: "Me going to Africa" or "My going to Africa"

    Here's the sense I make of these two sentences:


    1. "It isn't the question of me going to Africa", said the new manager, "only of whom I should go with".

    In this sentence, the word me is the object of "question of." This means "...the question of me [or someone else] going to Africa."



    2. "It isn't the question of my going to Africa", said the new manager, "only of whom I should go with".

    In this sentence, the word going is the object of "question of." My is a possessive pronoun functioning like an adjective, and going is a gerund functioning as a noun. This means "...the question of my going [or not going] to Africa."

    By the way, the use of the objective case pronoun whom is correct here.

  4. #4
    5jj's Avatar
    5jj is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    28,168
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: "Me going to Africa" or "My going to Africa"

    Quote Originally Posted by Richard1 View Post
    However the, "only of whom I should go with" doesn't make sense. What is it meant to be indicating?
    It makes sense:

    It isn't the question of my going to Africa", said the new manager, "only (the question) of whom I should go with".

  5. #5
    BigMak is offline Newbie
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Assamese
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • India
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    20
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: "Me going to Africa" or "My going to Africa"

    Quote Originally Posted by Richard1 View Post
    Hi,

    Number 2
    However the, "only of whom I should go with" doesn't make sense. What is it meant to be indicating?
    Thanks Richard for your reply. And what fivejedjon replied is correct.

  6. #6
    BigMak is offline Newbie
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Assamese
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • India
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    20
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: "Me going to Africa" or "My going to Africa"

    Quote Originally Posted by mykwyner View Post
    Here's the sense I make of these two sentences:


    1. "It isn't the question of me going to Africa", said the new manager, "only of whom I should go with".

    In this sentence, the word me is the object of "question of." This means "...the question of me [or someone else] going to Africa."



    2. "It isn't the question of my going to Africa", said the new manager, "only of whom I should go with".

    In this sentence, the word going is the object of "question of." My is a possessive pronoun functioning like an adjective, and going is a gerund functioning as a noun. This means "...the question of my going [or not going] to Africa."

    By the way, the use of the objective case pronoun whom is correct here.
    Thanks mykwyner for your perspicuous reply. Now I understand it better. I have one doubt though - from your explanation I infer both of the sentences are grammatically correct, just that chances of sentence no.2 occurring is more plausible in the real world. Am I correct?

    Re-writing the sentences to make them self-explanatory -

    1. "It isn't the question of me or someone else going to Africa", said the new manager, "only (the question) of whom I should go with".

    2. "It isn't the question of my going or not going to Africa", said the new manager, "only (the question) of whom I should go with".

  7. #7
    Bide is offline Newbie
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • China
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    27
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: "Me going to Africa" or "My going to Africa"

    You can use either me or my. Both are correct. me is the oblique case of I, but you may not use I there. (search "me going to" for many examples)
    In my opinion, the use of me in such constructions is an historical confusion, and it is really a phonological variant of my. my developed from mine, which was shortened to mi, (mine >mi = my) which some pronounced me.
    Us Cockneys still use me that way: Give us me shoes. That's me car. That is to say, in your sentences, me and my are probably phonological variants of the modern English possessive pronoun my. It makes very little sense to use an oblique case personal pronoun before a verbal noun.

    I can't agree with mykwyner's interpretation, since I can't interpret me in your sentence as the oblique case pronoun me. Also, the second part of the sentence quotes said lucky new manager: 'only of whom I should go with'. This clearly states his intention to go. The only question that remains there is: will he/she take his/her wife/husband or his/her secretary with him? Tough one that!

  8. #8
    5jj's Avatar
    5jj is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    28,168
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: "Me going to Africa" or "My going to Africa"

    Quote Originally Posted by Bide View Post
    I can't agree with mykwyner's interpretation, since I can't interpret me in your sentence as the oblique case pronoun me.
    I feel that Myhwyner' interpretation is correct, and your theory about me being a variant of my is, in this case, not.

    Try this:

    "It isn't the question of him/his going to Africa", said the new manager.

    "It isn't the question of us/our going to Africa", said the new manager.

    In all these utterances we are dealing with the much-debated question of whether we should use the object form of the pronoun or the possessive adjective.

  9. #9
    mykwyner is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    2,047
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: "Me going to Africa" or "My going to Africa"

    Bide,

    English has an oblique case? After 18 years of schooling in it, 20 years of teaching it and over 60 years of speaking it, this is the first time I've ever heard of an oblique case in English.

    Save the teaching for the teachers.

Similar Threads

  1. Defining "Street," "Road," "Avenue," "Boulevard"
    By ahumphreys in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 31-Dec-2010, 07:14
  2. [Vocabulary] Difference between "health" and "wellness", "Diagnosis" and "Analysis"
    By tobysky in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 28-Dec-2010, 22:43
  3. [Vocabulary] How do you pronounce "Cotton", "Button", "Britain", "Manhattan"...
    By Williamyh in forum Pronunciation and Phonetics
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 24-Dec-2009, 08:36
  4. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 08-Sep-2008, 08:27
  5. confusing words "expressed" or "express" and "named" or"names"
    By Dawood Usmani in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 26-Oct-2007, 19:33

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •