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    #11

    Re: Is this correct?

    Quote Originally Posted by charliedeut View Post
    Hi there,

    Please refer to post #7 to undo redundancy and ambiguity on this topic.

    Thanks

    Greetings,

    Charliedeut
    Sorry, I haven't provided the link. Visual arts - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Note that your post doesn't solve the ambiguity problem---you only gave one meaning of the term and the other meaning (that of "visual arts") still exists. Please have a look at this entry too. Again, the meaning it gives is different from yours, which adds to ambiguity.

    Lastly, It's not obvious to me that the term is a direct translation from Spanish. It exists in many languages. Are you sure it came to English from Spanish?
    Last edited by birdeen's call; 24-Jan-2011 at 15:13.

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #12

    Re: Is this correct?

    Charlie, the point isn't that you know what it means, or even that you gave us that excellent explanation. The point is that the average reader of this phrase won't know what it means. That's why I said it either needs to carry an explanation like yours, or the writer needs to be 100% that the audience who will read this resume is completely familiar with it.

    I can write something for an audience who knows a certain term and not explain it, but if what I am writing will be viewed by others, I need to use a different term or explain the term the first time I use it.

    If all art teachers know this phrase, and if only art teachers will read the resume, it's okay. But if someone else, like a human resources generalist, will read the resume first, then another way of expressing this must be found.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  2. charliedeut's Avatar
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    #13

    Re: Is this correct?

    Quote Originally Posted by birdeen's call View Post
    Lastly, It's not obvious to me that the term is a direct translation from Spanish. It exists in many languages. Are you sure it came to English from Spanish?
    No, that was my mistake : I did NOTmake it crystal clear that the OP translated it literally from Spanish, which is the OP's native language, as well as mine.

    Thank you on that one.

    Greetings,

    Charliedeut
    Last edited by charliedeut; 24-Jan-2011 at 15:13. Reason: Silly typo

  3. charliedeut's Avatar
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    #14

    Re: Is this correct?

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    Charlie, the point isn't that you know what it means, or even that you gave us that excellent explanation. The point is that the average reader of this phrase won't know what it means. That's why I said it either needs to carry an explanation like yours, or the writer needs to be 100% that the audience who will read this resume is completely familiar with it.

    I can write something for an audience who knows a certain term and not explain it, but if what I am writing will be viewed by others, I need to use a different term or explain the term the first time I use it.

    If all art teachers know this phrase, and if only art teachers will read the resume, it's okay. But if someone else, like a human resources generalist, will read the resume first, then another way of expressing this must be found.
    Hi Barb,

    Thanks on that one. I'm working at it. The thing is that I only deal with Spanish students; therefore, they hardly need such clarifications. But I'm still getting used to provide clearer data in such posts here. I'll certainly try my best! Thanks again.

    And now a rest for while

    Greetings,

    Charliedeut

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    #15

    Re: Is this correct?

    Quote Originally Posted by indonica View Post
    Worked with kids to strengthen their abilities to learn through plastic arts.
    You also need to be made aware, indonica, that kids should never be used in any sort of formal context.

    Many people, and I am one, find the word intensely irritating.

    Use 'children'.

    Rover

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