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    #1

    Post is "need to not" grammatically correct?

    Ross: You need to not touch any of those.
    -------------------------------------------
    From Friends S1 Ep5



    I think it means that you must not touch...

    like...you need to is you have to..and not touch

    but what about "you need not to touch"?

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: is "need to not" grammatically correct?

    Think of "not touch" as the opposite of "touch."

    You need to step here to open the secret compartment. -- Must do it.
    You need to NOT step here or the trap will spring and you will be caught. -- Must not do it.

    You must not touch any of those. is certainly more clear and direct.
    Don't touch any of those! is more direct yet.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: is "need to not" grammatically correct?

    Sorry, reference "need not" it means it's not necessary, but it's not forbidden.

    You needn't worry. Everything is taken care of. -- There is no need for you to worry.
    You need't go to the post office after all. I bought stamps on my way home. -- There is no need for you to go there.

    It does not have the same meaning as "You need to not go" which means you must not go, you must avoid going.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #4

    Re: is "need to not" grammatically correct?

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    Sorry, reference "need not" it means it's not necessary, but it's not forbidden.

    You needn't worry. Everything is taken care of. -- There is no need for you to worry.
    You need't go to the post office after all. I bought stamps on my way home. -- There is no need for you to go there.

    It does not have the same meaning as "You need to not go" which means you must not go, you must avoid going.
    Thanks, and I summarize that
    need not -> unnecessary
    need to not -> must not(avoid)

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