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  1. #1
    mokbon is offline Member
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    Post "got me" vs "you caught me"

    I wanna know the difference

    between "got me" and "you caught me"

    It seems almost same as ESL..

    Help me! :D

  2. #2
    5jj's Avatar
    5jj is offline VIP Member
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    Re: "got me" vs "you caught me"

    Quote Originally Posted by mokbon View Post
    I wanna know the difference between "got me" and "you caught me"

    It seems almost same as ESL..
    Please use try to use correct forms in this forum; it's 'want to', not 'wanna'.

    It would be useful to have more context for your 'got me' and 'caught me'. If you are telling your friends informally that you committed a crime and ran away, "but the police got/caught me", there is no difference.

    I don't understand your last sentence.

  3. #3
    mokbon is offline Member
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    Re: "got me" vs "you caught me"

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    Please use try to use correct forms in this forum; it's 'want to', not 'wanna'.

    It would be useful to have more context for your 'got me' and 'caught me'. If you are telling your friends informally that you committed a crime and ran away, "but the police got/caught me", there is no difference.

    I don't understand your last sentence.



    Sorry for the correct forms..
    ESL means English as Second Language.

    Like this situation..
    I don't say anything as a beginner of computer
    you say that I am beginner
    then I guess I can say "you caught me" or "got me"

    Is this right?

  4. #4
    5jj's Avatar
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    Re: "got me" vs "you caught me"

    Quote Originally Posted by mokbon View Post
    It seems almost same as ESL..
    I still don't understand your last sentence.

    If you have claimed to be computer-literate and have made some basic slips, and somebody says that you appear to be only a beginner, then you can say, "You've caught me (out)", or possibly, "You've got me".

  5. #5
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    Ouisch is offline Moderator
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    Re: "got me" vs "you caught me"

    In AmE, "you got me" is usually used either A) as an admission that someone has guessed or surmised something obvious about you, or something completely implausible about you or the situation; or B) as an admission that you're completely stumped.

    For example:

    A) "It says here to press 'any key.' I can't find the 'any' key."
    "I take it that you're unfamiliar with computers?"
    "You got me. This is the first time I've touched one."


    Husband: "I can't find my circular saw. Did you take it?"
    Wife (sarcastically): "You got me. I was secretly adding a room on to the house and now you've ruined the surprise."



    B) "Why do you think the boss has called for a special meeting this afternoon?"
    "You've got me. Our sales were up last month, all the reports were filed on time....I can't think of anything that would be bad news."



    "You caught me" implies that the person was in the act of doing something and was discovered by someone else:

    Boss walks past Fred's desk during lunch hour and notices that Fred has a photo of a nude woman on his computer screen.
    Fred sheepishly confesses: "You caught me. It's my friend's birthday, and I was making a funny card to send to him."

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