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    #1

    Jam tomorrow and Furry boots

    Hello,

    Could you tell me please how are these expressions used?


    ''Jam tomorrow" and "Furry boots?"

  1. 5jj's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Jam tomorrow and Furry boots

    'Jam tomorrow, jam yesterday, but never jam today.'

    The idea is that one is promised something that never materialises. It alwas has happened or will happen, but we never actually experience it.

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    #3

    Re: Jam tomorrow and Furry boots

    Did you try googling?

    About "jam tomorrow":
    Jam tomorrow
    Jam tomorrow - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    About "furry boots":
    far aboots? (Whaur aboots?) - Whereabouts? (Aberdeen is nicknamed "Furry Boots City" from a humorous spelling of far aboots - furry boots.)
    (from Doric dialect (Scotland) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)

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    #4

    Re: Jam tomorrow and Furry boots

    Oh my goodness. I had no idea what either of those meant. I've never heard either before as idioms. Thanks to you both.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #5

    Re: Jam tomorrow and Furry boots

    Jam tomorrow is a fairly standard idiom in BrE.

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    #6

    not a teacher

    Both idioms unheard of in America.

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