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  1. #1
    mokbon is offline Member
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    Wink "Get the whole night" vs "Stay up all night"

    Hi?

    "Stay up all night" means no sleep(= sit up all night)

    Then, what does "get the whole night" mean?

    it this the same?

  2. #2
    2006 is offline Banned
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    Default Re: "Get the whole night" vs "Stay up all night"

    Quote Originally Posted by mokbon View Post
    Hi?

    "Stay up all night" means no sleep(= sit up all night) You don't necessarily have to be sitting; whatever you are doing, you are not sleeping.

    Then, what does "get the whole night" mean? Without context, it doesn't mean anything.

    it this the same?
    2006

  3. #3
    mokbon is offline Member
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    Default Re: "Get the whole night" vs "Stay up all night"

    "what does "get the whole night" mean? Without context, it doesn't mean anything."

    Then what context does it have meaning?

    if I stay up all night, could I use it?

    Thanks for your help.

  4. #4
    JMurray is online now Key Member
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    Default Re: "Get the whole night" vs "Stay up all night"

    Hi mokbon. 2006 is right, "get the whole night" definitely does not have the same meaning as "stay up all night", and in fact it's difficult to think of any context for it. But here's a possibility:
    If you rent a car for the evening you might get four hours with the car for $100, but if you pay $200 you get the whole night.

  5. #5
    Rover_KE is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: "Get the whole night" vs "Stay up all night"

    Quote Originally Posted by mokbon View Post
    "what does "get the whole night" mean? Without context, it doesn't mean anything."

    Then what context does it have meaning?
    I'm wondering what prompted you to ask the question, mokbon.

    In what context did you encounter the phrase?

    Rover

  6. #6
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: "Get the whole night" vs "Stay up all night"

    Quote Originally Posted by JMurray View Post
    Hi mokbon. 2006 is right, "get the whole night" definitely does not have the same meaning as "stay up all night", and in fact it's difficult to think of any context for it. But here's a possibility:
    If you rent a car for the evening you might get four hours with the car for $100, but if you pay $200 you get the whole night.
    That's one possible context. Another would be if someone's slept for less than a whole night previously; a concerned parent might say 'You went to parties on Friday and Saturday. Tomorrow you have school, so you need to get the whole night.' (This sort of usage woulod be more likely with an added adjective: 'you need to get a decent/full/proper... night's sleep'.)

    b

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